Tag: santiago de pablo

CBS Book “The Basque Nation On-Screen” Inspires Prestigious Award

The book Creadores de sombras: ETA y el nacionalismo vasco a través del cine by Santiago de Pablo received the 2018 Muñoz Suay Prize awarded by the Spanish Arts and Film Academy. The award recognizes the best works of historical research on the Spanish film industry. A previous version of this book was published by the Center for Basque Studies in 2012 with the title The Basque Nation On-Screen: Cinema, Nationalism, and Political Violence. Professor De Pablo enjoyed the opportunity of serving as William Douglass Visiting Scholar in Reno during the academic year 2009-2010, researching on the relationship between cinema, Basque nationalism, and ETA.

Since its creation in 1997, the prestigious Muñoz Suay Award has supported research on the history of cinema in Spain. Well-known authors such as Ian Gibson, Manuel Gutiérrez-Aragón, or Vicente Sánchez-Biosca received this prize in previous years. The president of the Academy, filmmaker Mariano Barroso presented the prize to Santiago de Pablo in Madrid on November 212018.

The jury emphasized De Pablo’s “great knowledge of the subject, and his unbiased viewpoint of the very controversial subject of the representation of Basque political violence in contemporary Spanish cinema.”

Santiago de Pablo is Professor of History at the University of the Basque Country (Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea). He specializes in the history of Basque nationalism, and the relationship between history and cinema. He is author of several books, among Tierra sin paz: Guerra Civil, cine y propaganda en el País Vasco, La patria soñada: Historia del nacionalismo vasco desde su origen hasta la actualidador, and Diccionario ilustrado de símbolos del nacionalismo vasco.

https://www.academiadecine.com/2018/11/21/santiago-de-pablo-recibe-el-premio-munoz-suay-2018/

 

       

Surprising sightings of the lauburu

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A classic representation of the lauburu, via Wikimedia Commons

Many of you reading this will be familiar with the lauburu (literally meaning “four heads” but a term that could also be interpreted as four ends or tips) and its special significance in Basque culture. Its origins are a matter of some dispute (see the Wikipedia article here) and it is clearly not particular to the Basque Country alone, with similar symbols found all over the world and an especially strong connection to Celtic culture . Yet it has an undeniable resonance in Basque culture today. Check out, for example, just how many people like the lauburu enough to get a tattoo of it here in the photo album at Buber’s Basque Page.

What you may not know, though, is that a lauburu appears in a painting by Francisco Goya (1746-1828), who was of Basque ancestry on his father’s side. The painting in question is “Retrato de la Marquesa de Santa Cruz” (1805).

Retrato_de_la_Marquesa_de_Santa_Cruz

“Retrato de la Marquesa de Santa Cruz” (1805) by Francisco Goya, via Wikimedia Commons.

Even more unusual–or perhaps not–is a petroglyph or rock engraving on Woodhouse Crag, Ikley Moor, in West Yorkshire, England, which seems to resemble a lauburu. Also the cause of much speculation, as this Wikipedia article notes here, we’ll leave it up to you to be judge.

 

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“Ilkley Moor Swastika Stone” by T.J. Blackwell – Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Do you know of any other unlikely or unusual sightings of the lauburu?

Santiago de Pablo, author of the CBS publication The Basque Nation On-Screen: Cinema, Nationalism, and Political Violence,  has an interesting article (in Spanish) on the cultural and political significance of the lauburu, available free to download here.

The lauburu is also discussed in The Basques of Lapurdi, Zuberoa, and Lower Navarre:  Their History and Their Traditions, by Philippe Veyrin, with an introduction by Sandra Ott.  Veyrin actually describes the lauburu, rather poetically, as a “Basque rose.”