Tag: Donostia-san Sebastián 2016 European Capital of Culture

Henry Moore sculptures grace seafront promenade in Donostia

As part of the activities being held in conjunction with Donostia-San Sebastián being named European Capital of Culture for 2016, six sculptures by Henry Moore (1898-1986) were installed on Tuesday, June 21 in the city’s Zurriola Promenade in a “Street Art” initiative, and will remain in place, free for all to view, until September 4.

Moore is considered to be one of the great 20th-century sculptors and in bringing the six pieces to Donostia, the organizers–Obra Social “La Caixa” Foundation, the Henry Moore Foundation, and the Donostia City Council–are seeking to encourage a posthumous artistic dialogue between Moore and the equally renowned two towering figures of 20th-century Basque sculpture, Eduardo Chillida (1924-2002) and Jorge Oteiza (1908-2003), whose works also adorn the city.

This is a unique opportunity to see works by these three masters in the same outdoor setting.

See a video report (in Spanish) on the inauguration of these visiting sculptures here.

There are numerous references to Moore’s work in Oteiza’s Selected Writings, edited by Joseba Zulaika.

EMUSIK, the European Music School Festival, comes to Donostia

EMUSIK, the European Music School Festival came to Donostia and surrounding towns this past May 4-7. The festival, involving 8,500 pupils of music schools from all over Europe and 120 concerts, was part of the ongoing series of events associated with Donostia’s position as European Capital of Culture 2016.

The city was transformed for a few days into a lively hubbub of sound and color from all corners of Europe.

 

Donostia-San Sebastián: European Capital of Culture 2016

European Capital of Culture is a title awarded to a city or cities in the European Union in order to showcase that city during a specific calendar year. After receiving the award, the place in question then organizes a series of cultural events throughout the year to both promote the city itself and European culture more generally. In 2016 Donostia-San Sebastián will be the European Capital of Culture.

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Donostia, the city by the sea. Photo by Mikel Arrazola, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

As a result, the city has organized numerous events to coincide with this prestigious title, and here at the Center we will be following these developments with close interest. If you’re planning a trip to the Basque Country (or even elsewhere in Europe) in 2016, don’t forget that Donostia-San Sebastián will be one of the main hot spots to visit in Europe this coming year…

For more information about Donostia-San Sebastián as European Capital of Culture in 2016 (abbreviated to DSS2016) click here.

See also a report by The Guardian on DSS2016 here.

For general tourism information click here.

Check out, too, the video here from our good friends at USAC (the University Studies Abroad Consortium) about US college students who have spent time in Donostia-San Sebastián on the USAC program there.

Grants for Translators to Study Basque in the Basque Country

Donostia-San Sebastián 2016 European Capital of Culture and  the Etxepare Basque Institute, in collaboration with EIZIE (the Association of Translators, Correctors and Interpreters of Basque Language), have just launched a new program aimed at bringing translators to the Basque Country to study Euskara (the Basque language), with a view to them incorporating Basque as either a pivot or source language for their future translations.

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“E Translating Wikipedia” by Marbora – Own work. Licensed under CC0 via Wikimedia Commons

 

The translators chosen will be awarded grants to live in at a barnetegi (a boarding school for adult learners of Basque) and complete intensive Basque-language classes there.

This is a great offer for anyone interested in learning (or improving their) Basque as well as using this knowledge professionally. The deadline for applications is May 14. Don’t miss out on this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity!

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Anyone interested in studying Basque should check out Nancy Zubiri’s affectionate record here of her journey on the road to becoming an euskaldun or Basque speaker.  And for the experience of living and studying in a barnetegi, see the “Euskaldundu: One Girl’s Journey to the Land and Language of Her Ancestors” blog at the EITB (Basque Public Media Group) website.

If you’re interested in the Basque language, check out Estibaliz Amorrortu’s Basque Sociolinguistics, which examines the social and cultural aspects of Euskara, and The Challenge of a Bilingual Society in the Basque Country, edited by Pello Salaburu and Xabier Alberdi, a collection of essays that explores the current status of Basque and the challenges it faces as a minority language.