Tag: Donostia 2016

Henry Moore sculptures grace seafront promenade in Donostia

As part of the activities being held in conjunction with Donostia-San Sebastián being named European Capital of Culture for 2016, six sculptures by Henry Moore (1898-1986) were installed on Tuesday, June 21 in the city’s Zurriola Promenade in a “Street Art” initiative, and will remain in place, free for all to view, until September 4.

Moore is considered to be one of the great 20th-century sculptors and in bringing the six pieces to Donostia, the organizers–Obra Social “La Caixa” Foundation, the Henry Moore Foundation, and the Donostia City Council–are seeking to encourage a posthumous artistic dialogue between Moore and the equally renowned two towering figures of 20th-century Basque sculpture, Eduardo Chillida (1924-2002) and Jorge Oteiza (1908-2003), whose works also adorn the city.

This is a unique opportunity to see works by these three masters in the same outdoor setting.

See a video report (in Spanish) on the inauguration of these visiting sculptures here.

There are numerous references to Moore’s work in Oteiza’s Selected Writings, edited by Joseba Zulaika.

EMUSIK, the European Music School Festival, comes to Donostia

EMUSIK, the European Music School Festival came to Donostia and surrounding towns this past May 4-7. The festival, involving 8,500 pupils of music schools from all over Europe and 120 concerts, was part of the ongoing series of events associated with Donostia’s position as European Capital of Culture 2016.

The city was transformed for a few days into a lively hubbub of sound and color from all corners of Europe.

 

Danborrada!

January 20th is a special day for every citizen of Donostia. It’s San Sebastian Day, the festival where thousand of people, from kids to adults, take their drums to the streets to play Raimundo Sarriegi’s compositions. You can hear some of the compositions, including Donostiako Martxa, the unofficial hymn of Donostia, in Eresbil’s webpage.

Wearing all kind of fake military uniforms, cook costumes, and traditional Basque costumes, each of the danborrada (tamborrada in Spanish), a group of drum players representing schools, associations, and gastronomic clubs, walk the streets of the Old City, the downtown and the outskirts of Donostia.

Kids playing drums during the 2010 Danborrada, by Donostia-San Sebastian 2016.

Kids playing drums during the 2010 Danborrada, by Donostia-San Sebastian 2016.

The festival has it roots in the Napoleonic invasion of the city, when young people will make fun of the soldiers and their parades. In the late 19th century, the danborrada was one of the various carnival activities. In the 20th century, San Sebastian day grown to become the mayor festival in the city. During the last years, the main change has been the more and more active participation of women, which are now more visible.

In 2016, San Sebastian Day is even more special, because it’s the starting point of Donostia’s year as European Capital of Culture.

Donostia-San Sebastián: European Capital of Culture 2016

European Capital of Culture is a title awarded to a city or cities in the European Union in order to showcase that city during a specific calendar year. After receiving the award, the place in question then organizes a series of cultural events throughout the year to both promote the city itself and European culture more generally. In 2016 Donostia-San Sebastián will be the European Capital of Culture.

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Donostia, the city by the sea. Photo by Mikel Arrazola, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

As a result, the city has organized numerous events to coincide with this prestigious title, and here at the Center we will be following these developments with close interest. If you’re planning a trip to the Basque Country (or even elsewhere in Europe) in 2016, don’t forget that Donostia-San Sebastián will be one of the main hot spots to visit in Europe this coming year…

For more information about Donostia-San Sebastián as European Capital of Culture in 2016 (abbreviated to DSS2016) click here.

See also a report by The Guardian on DSS2016 here.

For general tourism information click here.

Check out, too, the video here from our good friends at USAC (the University Studies Abroad Consortium) about US college students who have spent time in Donostia-San Sebastián on the USAC program there.

Center Books Take Stage at Tabakalera

Etxepare presentation

Left to right: Daniel Montero, Argitxu Camus-Etxecopar, Aizpea Goenaga, Bill Douglass, Mari Jose Olaziregi, and Koldo San Sebastián

Five of the Center’s books on the Basque diaspora in the United States were presented at the brand new and ultra hip Tabakalera Cultural Center in Donostia-San Sebastián yesterday. Myself, along with researchers Koldo San Sebastián and Argitxu Camus-Etxecopar, author (and all-around Mr. Basque) Bill Douglass, and with co-sponsors of the event the Etxepare Basque Institute represented by director Aizpea Goenaga and director of the diffusion of Basque Mari Jose Olaziregi, presented five books that treat the Basque diaspora in the United States from a variety of perspectives: the 2 volumes of Basques in the United States, led by Koldo San Sebastián and Argitxu Camus-Etxecopar but also representing a network of reseachers looking at Basque immigration through time and space, Basque Explorers in the Pacific Ocean by Bill Douglass, Zelestina Urza in Outer Space by David Romtvedt, and Garmendia and the Black Rider by Kirmen Uribe and illustrated by Mikel Valverde. We chose these books to present on the diaspora because of the variety of perspective, viewpoints and voices that they bring to writing about the presence of Basques in the United States.

The event received wide coverage in the Basque press, including an important story in El Diario Vasco.

As readers of this blog will surely know, Basques in the United Statesrepresents a giant undertaking that has already been the product of many years of research and that will certainly result in many more. Now containing names and bibliographic information for nearly 10,000 Basque immigrants, we hope in forthcoming editions to grow this into as a complete and comprehensive as possible encyclopedia of all first-generation Basque immigrants to the United States. We hope to do this with the continuing diligence of researchers like Koldo and Argitxu (and too many others to name here), but also with your help, that is why we’ve set up basquesintheus.blogs.unr.edu where we hope that interested people will also help us continue this important historical work.

Basque Explorers in the Pacific Ocean is a different kind of work altogether, one of the most recent publications by one of the most important Basque researchers and anthropologists of all-time, it takes readers on an exciting journey along with the galleons and caravels of the “Spanish” empire when Basque mariners formed an essential corpus in the empires exploration of this tremendous area which was known for more than 200 years as the “Spanish lake.”

Zelestina Urza in Outer Space provides yet a different aspect on Basque immigration, telling the story of young Zelestina Urza, who is just 16 years old when she arrives in Wolf, Wyoming from the green hills of Arnegi, throuhg her story, and her friendship with another young Native America woman, not only is the Basque diaspora explored, but also are the whole idea of the “winning” of the west and what it really meant in human terms.

Finally, Garmendia and the Black Rider takes maybe the most exotic take on the Basque diaspora of all of the books presented. Written by acclaimed Basque poet and novelist Kirmen Uribe, it treats the subject of the Basque immigrant from the perspective of modern Basque culture, and, as a children’s book, also with an eye that brings the Western experience to life in a completely different way that what we are usually presented with.

In addition to the presentation of the book, there was also other exciting news at the presentation. The Etxepare Institute has organized, in conjunction with the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, the creation of a William A. Douglass chair in Anthropology, which will help us continue to build strong academic links that promote Basque Studies throughout the United States and the world!

What an exciting day for Basque culture in the diaspora and everywhere!