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CBS Welcomes New Graduate Student Nerea Aizagirre

Meet new CBS graduate student Nerea Eizagirre Telleria!

Nerea was born in 1992 in Zumaia, Gipuzkoa. She studied in the Public School of her hometown until she finished High School. She got an “academic excellence” competitive award for her high school transcripts and her performance at the standardized competitive tests. Due to the award, the Basque Government financed her university studies. During high school, Nerea won literary prizes for young writers: Azkue Saria(Euzkaltzaindia) and Urruzuno Saria(Basque Government). In 2009, she moved to Barcelona to start her undergraduate studies in Literature at the Universitat de Barcelona. After finishing her BA, she moved back to the Basque Country again. She studied for an MA in the Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea EHU-UPV (University of Basque Country), at the faculty of Sarriko, Bilbao. She earned an MA in Globalization and Development, focusing on international conflicts and peace building processes. She wrote her MA thesis about the Syrian war, focusing on Kurdish women. While she was studying her MA in Bilbao, the City Hall of Bilbao selected her for the “Solidary Youth” program. The City Hall of Bilbao provided Nerea an apartment to live in during a year in the multicultural neighborhood of San Francisco in Bilbao. Her role was to volunteer in the neighborhood, participate in different forums, and teach Basque to children in the Public School called Miribilla Eskola. Next year, she moved back to her hometown Zumaia, and studied for an MA in Teacher Training for Secondary Educationat in the EHU-UPV Donostia. Between the periods of 2017-2019, she worked as a High School Language teacher (Basque, Spanish and English). She served as a teacher in the Basque Public Secondary Education System in the localities of Leioa, Azpeitia, Barakaldo and Berriz. She left her last job in Berriz just a couple of weeks before coming to Reno.

Nerea just started her PhD in Basque Studies in World Languages and Literatures. The following years she will write a dissertation about Basque literature and exile, analyzing the literary work of Joseba Sarrionaindia. Her academic fields are Basque Literature, Comparative Literature, Gender Studies and Multicultural Studies.

    

March 9, 1980: First Basque autonomous parliamentary elections following death of Franco

Logo of the Basque parliament, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Logo of the Basque parliament, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Although a Basque parliament was envisaged as part of the 1936 Statute of Autonomy, the outbreak of the civil war meat that it never materialized as such. With Franco’s victory in the war and the dictatorship that followed, it was not until after his death in 1975 that a new statute was passed in 1979, leading to the holding of the first Basque autonomous parliamentary elections in the modern era, on March 9, 1980. This led to the first legislature of the parliament, between 1980 and 1984.

The Basque parliament. Photo by Iker Merodio, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The Basque parliament. Photo by Iker Merodio, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Today the Basque parliament–Eusko Legebiltzarra in Basque–serves as the main legislative body of the Autonomous Community of the Basque Country, made up of three provinces in Hegoalde or the Southern Basque Country: Araba, Bizkaia, and Gipuzkoa.  It is made up of seventy-five representatives (twenty-five from each province, despite the significant differences in population size among them)

March 4, 2008: The “non” discovery of the historic trawler, the Nabarra

In March 1937, one of the most famous engagements during the Spanish Civil War in the Basque Country took place: the Battle of Cape Matxitxako.  On March 4, 2008, a team of marine scientists from AZTI thought it had discovered the wreck of one of the Basque trawlers that took part in that encounter, the Nabarra, off the coast of Bermeo, Bizkaia.

The port of Bermeo today. Photo by Euskalduna, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The port of Bermeo today. Photo by Euskalduna, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

According to its investigation, the characteristics of the wreck the team initially came across matched those of the Nabarra, but it could not be totally sure without further dives, carried out by members of the Kresala association.  More tests were undertaken and the Basque government even announced that all the indications did indeed seem to point to the wreck being the Nabarra.  However, after fully checking the site, at a June 2008 press conference it was confirmed that the wreck was not that of the Nabarra, but instead that of a Nazi German merchant vessel, the Hochheimer, which had been sunk by a British submarine in May 1944.

The mystery of the Nabarra‘s whereabouts thus remains.

February 28, 1513: Twelve cannons added to the Gipuzkoa coat of arms

The origins of coats of arms go back to the surcoat, a garment worn by knights over their armor and emblazoned with their personal “arms” or design. In time, these arms became identified with larger entities like a whole noble family, a royal house, town, province, and so on. In effect, these coats of arms became easily identifiable emblems by which to represent such an entity, a kind of logo. On February 28, 1513, Queen Joanna of Castile, Joanna the Mad (!), conceded Gipuzkoa the right to incorporate twelve cannons on its coat of arms.

The coat of arms of Gipuzkoa, 1513-1979, featuring the monarch and twelve cannons. Image by Miguillen, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The coat of arms of Gipuzkoa, 1513-1979, featuring the monarch and twelve cannons. Image by Miguillen, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

In 1512, Gipuzkoan troops, in the service of her father, Ferdinand, and the crown of Castile and Aragon had taken part  in its conquest of Navarre. The Gipuzkoans fought the Navarrese at the Battles of Belate and Elizondo. During the war, the Gipuzkoans took twelve French cannons that had been used by the Navarrese in the siege of Iruñea-Pamplona.

The coat of arms of Gipuzkoa, 1979-present. Image by HansenBCN, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The coat of arms of Gipuzkoa, 1979-present. Image by HansenBCN, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Between 1513 and 1979, then, those twelve cannons, representing Gipuzkoan service to the Kingdom of Castile and Aragon and the military defeat of the Kingdom of Navarre featured on the province’s official coat of arms. In 1979, though, by a vote of the provincial council of Gipuzkoa, it was decided to remove the cannons. The reason given was that they represented a glorification of war and that the symbol was humiliating for Navarre. At the same time, it was also decided to withdraw the figure of a monarch being crowned (thought to represent either Alfonso VIII or Henry IV of Castile).

The legend Fidelisima Bardulia, numquam superada means “Most loyal Bardulia, never overcome” (Bardulia being an ancient Roman term for a region in the north of the Iberian Peninsula that derived from the Roman term for a tribe of people, the Varduli, who inhabited present-day Gipuzkoa).  The trees are Taxus baccata, a conifer known in English as the common yew, while the figures holding clubs represent the aforementioned Varduli.

Spring 2019 CBS Lecture Series

This semester we a have an exciting line-up of lectures starting on March 7th! The Lecture Series will feature CBS professors Sandra Ott and Mariann Vázci, Jon Bilbao Basque Library Intern Mónica Buxeda, our two new graduate students Eneko Tuduri and Nerea Eizagirre, Anthropology professor Jenanne Ferguson, and Spanish professor Tania Leal.

As usual, lectures are on Thursdays from 4:30 pm to 5:30 pm in MIKC 305N. Admission is free, so stop by and learn about the amazing research developed by the faculty and students at UNR!

Visions of a Basque American Westerner: An International Conference on the Writings of Frank Bergon

On March 13 -14, the Center for Basque Studies and the Jon Bilbao Basque Library are pleased to be hosting Visions of a Basque American Westerner: An International Conference on the Writings of Frank Bergon. The conference will take place in the Leonard Faculty & Graduate Room of the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center at the University of Nevada, Reno.

The conference gathers ten scholars and writers from the United States and Europe to discuss and reflect on Frank Bergon’s novels, essays, and critical works from their various perspectives, emphasizing the Basque themes in his writings.

The first day of the conference features an introduction by Frank Bergon, and presentations by scholars William Heath, Monika Madinabeitia, Joseba Zulaika, Sylvan Goldberg, and Zeese Papanikolas. At 6 p.m. in the Knowledge Center Wells Fargo Auditorium, Monika Mandinabeitia and Frank Bergon will discuss the book Petra, My Basque Grandmother, written about Bergon’s grandmother. Concluding the night, fifteen of Petra’s great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren will perform Basque dances with Zazpiak Bat Dancers from the Reno Basque Club, accompanied by musicians Mercedes Mendive, David Romtvedt, and Caitlin Belem Romtvedt.

On the second day of the conference, Xabier Irujo will provide an introduction, followed by speakers Iñaki Arrieta Baro, David Río, Nancy Cook, and David Means. At 6:00 p.m., Frank Bergon will talk about Basque aspects of his new book, Two-Buck Chuck & The Marlboro Man: The New Old West, followed by a conversation with scholars Monika Madinabeitia and David Río, about his life and work as a Western and Basque American writer.

All events are free and open to the public. To register click here.

We hope to see you there!

About Frank Bergon:

Frank Bergon, photo by Sam Moore

Frank Bergon was born in Ely, Nevada, and grew up on a ranch in California’s San Joaquin Valley. He has published eleven books—four novels, a critical study, five edited collections, and most recently a nonfiction book, Two Buck Chuck & The Marlboro Man: The New Old West. His writings focus on the history and environment of the American West, including Basques of his own heritage. He is a member of the Nevada Writers Hall of Fame.

February 16, 1980: Inauguration of Vitoria-Gasteiz Airport

Aena's official logo for Vitoria Airport, designed by Javier Mariscal. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Aena’s official logo for Vitoria Airport, designed by Javier Mariscal. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Many of you will be familiar with Bilbao Airport, based in Loiu, and you may also have arrived in the Basque Country via Biarritz Pays Basque Airport or the smaller Donostia-San Sebastián airport, based in Hondarribia, but did you know that Vitoria-Gasteiz is also served by an airport, in the nearby town of Foronda? Vitoria-Gasteiz Airport was inaugurated on February 16, 1980.

Antonov An-225 airplane at Vitoria Gasteiz Foronda airport. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Antonov An-225 airplane at Vitoria Gasteiz Foronda airport. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Vitoria-Gasteiz Airport is located some 5 miles from the city center. In order to build the airport, the village of Otaza located at the end of the runway had to be demolished. The first plane to land at Vitoria-Gasteiz Airport was a Dassault Mystère fighter bomber of the Spanish Armed Forces that flew from Madrid. The first plane to take off was a charter flight to Palma de Mallorca and in April that same year the first regular Madrid-Vitoria-Gasteiz flight was established.

The check-in area at Vitoria-Gasteiz Airport. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The check-in area at Vitoria-Gasteiz Airport. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Since 1993, the airport has  specialized in cargo services and is currently the fourth main cargo hub in Spain behind Madrid Barajas, Barcelona, and Zaragoza. It has enjoyed sporadic passenger services, with Irish airline Ryanair operating two regular flights to London and Dublin between 2005 and 2007, and returning to Vitoria-Gasteiz Airport in 2016, initially with year-round services to Bergamo and Tenerife, and now also offering flights to Seville and Cologne/Bonn.

Check out the official website here.

 

 

CBS Welcomes New Graduate Student Eneko Tuduri

Please join us in welcoming one of our new graduate students Eneko Tuduri, who tells us about his interest in Basque Studies, and his first experiences at the CBS, in Reno and the USA. Ongi etorri Eneko!

“I grew up in Donosti, although I was born in Donibane Lohizune in the French Basque Country. I studied Art History for my Bachelor’s degree, and earned a degree in Digital Photography in Gasteiz. After that, with the Global Training program of the Basque Government, I did an 8-month internship in the Basque Museum and Cultural Center of Boise, Idaho. There I worked on the project of Basque Musicians in the West, and the Basque Radio programs broadcasted for sheepherders. Before that, I had already focused my interest on the world of museums, and I completed another internship in the San Telmo museum. After Boise, I studied for a Master’s degree in Museum Studies at the Universidad a Distancia de Madrid. Last year I curated an exhibition on Carlism and cinema. I also worked as a tourist guide in San Sebastian for several years.When I was finishing my Art History degree, I wrote my senior thesis about 14th-century Gothic paintings in a church building in San Salvador de Gallipienzo in Navarre. The paintings were very fragmented and damaged, but they captured me and, ever since, I’ve tried to understand what they might have looked like originally. What I found is that many other similar Navarrese paintings of the same period from the 13th to the 15th century were barely studied. I realized that this research topic could be a very good one for a Ph.D study program. I find the Medieval period in the Basque Country fascinating.

Paintings of San Zoilo de Caseda, Navarre, recently restored with the funding of a local historic association (Asociación cultural ermita de San Zoilo). Dated by style to the middle of the 14th century.

The freedom the tutorial Ph.D of the CBS can give me was very attractive, and it is not something I can find easily at European universities. Also, with the collection of the CBS library and the resources of the UNR library, it is not necessary to be in the Basque Country to do the bibliographical research. I will focus on those paintings that remained under-studied or barely researched.  These paintings are mostly in rural areas and small villages, they are barely known and difficult to access. Some of these paintings are in danger of disappearing. I would like to have an overall understanding of the wall painting art of XIII, XIV and XV century Navarre. This was the most common decoration in most European kingdoms, but sadly, we do not know much about Navarrese masters and workshops. It is obvious they were distinctively Navarrese painters and workshops with their own style, but their importance has been overshadowed by international styles and painters.

I had already lived in the USA for almost a year with the Basque community of Boise. However, Reno was a totally different city than Boise, which has its own positives and negatives. One of the best things are the University, which i find amazing. I have only spent three weeks here, but I feel I will need much more time to discover all the activities the University has to offer.

The apse of San Juan Bautista de Eristain, Navarre from the 13th or 14th centuries.

CBS Event: Literatura eta Musika with David Romtvedt

Do you have an interest in the Basque Diaspora and enjoy good music? If so, the CBS and the Jon Bilbao Basque Library is pleased to invite you to Literatura eta Musika featuring CBS author and accordionist David Romtvedt on March 11-12 at 4 p.m. in UNR’s Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center Rotunda.

David and Caitlin

On March 11, David will be reading from his book Buffalotarrak: An Anthology of the Basques of Buffalo, Wyoming. This book is a collection of personal essays written by and about the Basques of Buffalo. These stories illuminate the experiences of the Basques in Wyoming and tie into the broader theme of the Basque diaspora in the American West.

On March 12, David will be reading from Zelestina Urza in Outer Space. In this historical fiction piece, David explores the experiences of Zelestina, a 16 year-old Basque girl in northern Wyoming. Inspired by the real life experiences of two Basque women, the character of Zelestina departs from the stereotype of the Basque immigrant as a lonely sheepherder.

After each talk, David will perform on the accordion and will be accompanied by his daughter, Caitlin Belem Romtvedt, an accomplished musician who specializes in “Brazilian and Cuban music, and old-style swing, blues, and jazz”. After the lecture on March 12 only, Elko-based Basque accordionist Mercedes Mendive will join the duo.

Mercedes Mendive

Admission is free! We hope to see you there!

February 9, 1918: Birth of raquetista Irene Ibaibarriaga

Arguably the most emblematic sport of the Basques is pelota in its many varieties, one of which, Jai-Alai, was especially popular in the United States at the close of the twentieth century. Another variety, played with tennis racquets by women, was also popular in the twentieth century, from the 1910s to the 1980s. One of the leading raquetistas of her generation, Irene Ibaibarriaga Ormaetxea, was born in Ermua, Bizkaia, on February 9, 1918.

She learned the sport in nearby Eibar, one of the strongholds of Basque pelota and at the age of fifteen she moved to Madrid, where her older sister Pili played professionally, to begin a career in the sport. She was offered a contract to play professionally in the Americas but turned down the opportunity and, despite her career suffering as a result of the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), she still managed to make a living from the sport, playing in tournaments in Valencia, Barcelona, and later Donostia, often playing doubles with her sister. Later in her career she suffered a serious injury when a ball damaged her ear. She subsequently retired from the sport.

In 2013, a special tribute was paid to her on the occasion of the 7th Women’s Pelota Day held in Irura, Gipuzkoa. Ibaibarriaga died in 2014 at the age of ninety-six.

Check out Olatz Gonzalez Abrisketa’s Basque Pelota: A Ritual, An Aesthetic.

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