“The Great Zambini is a story that has a touch of sadness but, in the end, we can see some hope in the relationship between father and son.” Emilio Pérez

 

Situated in the middle of the desert, in an almost lunar landscape, a rickety roulette serves as home for a family that lives among the abandoned remains of an old circus. The son (Aníbal Tártalo) is ashamed of the father (Emilio Gavira) because he is a dwarf, and suffers the mockery of the other children. One day the father observes his son`s fascination with an image of the man stepping on the moon for the first time on television. He designs a plan to win his son`s admiration. The difficult relations between the central characters are articulated through their expressive looks that rarely cross, but perfectly condense the emotions that live within each one of them: the son`s shame, the father’s pain, and the mother’s sadness (Esperanza de la Vega), who is torn between the two.

One day the father is waiting for his son at the exit of the school and notices that, in front of him, a little girl is holding on to her mother`s hand, and watches him fixedly. The dwarf man winks, provoking a timid smile from the little one. His own son, however, is incapable of showing any sign of love for his father. He hides in the bathroom until the rest of the students leave because he is ashamed of showing with his dwarf father in public.

The father doesn`t tolerate his disrespect and punishes him by not allowing him to have dinner. The mother, however, who divides her love and understanding between them, brings him a sandwich to the canon, where the child once again hides from his father. The father observes the scene from the door of the mobile home and understands that he must do something in order to recover the love of his son. At this very moment, a fabulous plan is born, and magic erupts into the story, evoking with the magic of the old circus. Zambini relocates and re-furbishes the canon that, until then, served as the hiding place of the embarrassed child. With exquisite subtleness and narrative economy, the filmmakers reveal the father`s plan: resuscitate the old days in the circus, once again light the fuse of the marvelous scene where children`s hopes and dreams become reality, and thus replace the child`s embarrassment with fascination and admiration for his father.

Monday Movies presents Basque short films and contemporary filmmakers. The short films presented here have gained international recognition thanks to the Basque Government`s distribution program Kimuak, and they are part of the CBS`s upcoming book publication Kimuak Short Films: Seeds of Basque Cinema.

Click on the link below to watch the film. Enjoy!