Category: University of Nevada Reno (page 1 of 5)

CBS Lecture Series

The Center for Basque Studies invites you to attend our Fall 2018 Multidisciplinary Lecture Series. Starting this month, the series will showcase the research of our librarian, our visiting scholars from the Basque Country, and faculty from the UNR Anthropology Department. Our lecturers will cover a wide range of topics and disciplines. It is held on Thursdays from 4:30 to 5:30 in the Basque Studies Conference Room (MIKC 305N). Be sure to check it out!

The schedule for the Lecture Series is:

OCT 25 “Debates on Nationalism in the Basque Country: 1968-2018” by Haritz Azurmendi

NOV 8  “A Critical Analysis of Cooperative Multinationalization: A comparative study of the French ‘Up Group’ and the Mondragon ‘Fagor Ederlan Group’” by Anjel Errasti

NOV 15 “Preserving Basque Digital Photographs: Dealing with Legacy Metadata and File Formats” by Iñaki Arrieta Baro

NOV 29 “Contested Reconciliation in the Basque Country: A Feminist Approach” by Andrea García González

DEC 6 “Politics, Aesthetics and Technologies of the Self in Sakha Blessing Poems” by Jenanne Ferguson

Etxea: Memoirs of Gernika

Ardi Baltza Kontalari

The William A. Douglass Center for Basque Studies invites you to Etxea: Memoirs of Gernika on November 2, 2018 at 7 p.m. in the UNR Wells Fargo Auditorium (MIKC 124). In this performance by the Lamoille, NV based Basque dancing group, Ardi Baltza Kontalari, the eyewitness accounts of the survivors of the tragic Nazi bombings on Gernika in 1937 are presented and honored. Through their lyrical and contemporary dance styles, mixed with traditional Basque steps, the dancers demonstrate the strength and resilience of the Basque people in the face of adversity.

Etxea: Memoirs of Gernika at the 2018 NABO Convention

This performance will also feature a short introductory talk by Dr. Xabier Irujo, professor at the Center for Basque Studies and author of The Bombing of Gernika: A Short History, on the events leading up to the bombing. Free admission.

To learn more about the Ardi Baltza Kontalari, visit: https://www.facebook.com/ardibaltza/

For information on Dr. Irujo’s book, a companion to this performance, visit: https://basquebooks.com/collections/frontpage/products/the-bombing-of-gernika-a-short-history

Incoming Grad: Callie Greenhaw!

 

Welcome to our newest graduate student, Callie Greenhaw! Callie is a University of Nevada, Reno alumni, having earned her BA in Anthropology with a minor in Archaeology in 2016. When Callie was an undergrad at UNR, she took Dr. Ott’s Basque class to fill an academic requirement, and ended up really enjoying it. Growing up in Elko, Nevada, Callie was surrounded by Basque culture constantly, but did not realize its significance until this class. She enjoyed the class so much in fact, that she considered minoring in Basque Studies, but did not have time, and instead took as many Basque Studies classes as she could before graduating.

 

Before returning to UNR to pursue her PhD in Basque Studies, Callie traveled to Greece and the UK to pursue her studies, and went on to earn her MS in Bioarchaeology and Forensic Anthropology from the University College London in 2017. Up until now, Callie’s field of study has been dental anthropology, her thesis at the UCL being the postmarital residence patterns of post-medieval Chichester in West Sussex by analyzing the sexual variation of dental nonmetric traits.

 

During her time with us at The Center for Basque Studies, Callie will be studying the Basques of Elko. Her goals include providing an academic study to the Elko Basque community and add to the collection of research on the Basque Diaspora, learn Euskara, and gain teaching experience and publish some of her research.

Txakolina Fest at Craft Wine and Beer

Mural design and photo by Erik Burke

I like to think of myself as an unofficial ambassador for the Basque wine, Txakolina. Apart from making it a chapter of my dissertation, which demonstrates how Euskara is used to market locally produced foods, I also just love drinking it. So, when this libation is celebrated right here in Reno at Craft Wine and Beer, it’s time to make some noise!

This year, Craft Wine and Beer’s Txakolina Fest will be on Friday, May 25th from 5-9pm. Ty Martin and his crew put on this Basque-inspired event, and seem to amp it up every year.  Here is his sneak preview of what is to come this Friday:

Between graduation parties, the first BBQ’s of the season, and all the yard work (so much yard work), we also cram in a bunch of seasonal events, and my favorite event we do might just be TXAKOLINA FEST! It’s always a hustle to get the fresh vintage of our favorite Basques wines to Reno before everyone checks out for summer, but the stars aligned this year. For your sampling pleasure, we’ll be pouring AT LEAST six Txakolina from Bizkaia, Getaria, and Alava alongside various Basque ciders. Glasses can be had all evening on Friday, May 25th, from 5pm until close with a more formal(ish) flight offering from 5p-7p. We will also smoke some chorizo from Villa Basque down Carson way. Rumor has it that some dancers from Zazpiak Bat may be just loose enough by the evening to cut a rug and show you a few steps. Lastly, in the spirit of Basque competition, we’ll have a “Best Porron Pouring” contest and lots of dancing as the night wears on. Ladies, bring your best war cry!

For the oenophiles and foodies out there who would like to learn more about this Basque wine, check out the headlines that list several must-try “Txakolinak“:

Decanter’sTxakoli: The Spanish wine style you need to try in 2018

Food and Wine’sThirty Roses to drink this summer

Forbes’ Txakoli: The Choice Wine for Spring Sipping

Hope to see you all at Craft Wine and Beer this Friday for some Txakolina sippin’!

 

 

CBS Student Kerri Lesh receives Bilinski Fellowship

This semester Center for Basque Studies student, Kerri Lesh, was awarded a Bilinksi Fellowship for 2018-2019 by the College of Liberal Arts. She has been the first student from the Center for Basque Studies to be awarded a Bilinski Fellowship. A reception was held for the eight awardees who were announced May 3rd. Associate Dean Jane Detweiler presented the awards after a short welcome speech provided by Dean Debra Moddelmog. The previous year’s recipients were present to share their work with a poster presentation as they noshed on cookies and fruit.

Kerri was awarded $30,000 to support her in writing her dissertation, which focuses on the use of Euskara alongside the marketing of local gastronomic products of the Basque Country.

Russell J. and Dorothy S. Bilinski’s goal in life was to be independent and challenged intellectually. They strongly believed in people being self-sufficient, ambitious, and above all, responsible. Both Russell and Dorothy were true intellectuals, as well as being adventuresome, independent and driven. Russell was a researcher, academician, and an entrepreneur. Dorothy was an accomplished artist and patron of the arts. Russell and Dorothy believed that education was a means to obtain independence, and this is the legacy they wished to pass on to others.

In furtherance of that goal, when Russell and Dorothy died, they left a significant gift for the formation of a nonprofit corporate foundation. The Bilinski Educational Foundation seeks to fulfill this legacy by providing fellowship funds for post-secondary education for students who have demonstrated, and are likely to maintain, both the highest academic achievement and good moral character, but who lack the financial resources to complete their post-secondary education.

 

New Book: Jón Gudmundsson Laerdi’s True Account and the Massacre of Basque Whalers in Iceland in 1615

From the Center for Basque Studies Press Basque Books Bulletin:

New book!

Jon Gudmudsson Laeri’s True Account and the Massacre of Basque Whalers in Iceland in 1615

On the night of September 20, 1615, the eve of the feast of St. Matthew, an expedition of Basque whalers lost their ships in a fjord near Trékyllisvík, Iceland, during a terrible storm. This led to a series of events that culminated in their October massacre at hands of the islanders. The Basque mariners’ bodies, dismembered, would not be buried. However, not all Icelanders saw that massacre with good eyes. One of them, Jón Guðmundsson, better known as Jón lærði (1574–1658) or “the wise man”, wrote an essay on those events in defense of the victims titled “Sönn frásaga” (The true story). Four hundred years later, on April 20, 2015, an international conference investigated various aspects of this tragic episode of the history of Iceland and the Basque Country. The academic meeting took place at the National Library of Iceland with the participation of experts from all over the world. The program, commemorating the fourth centenary of the massacre of Basque whalers in Iceland, was sponsored by the Government of Gipuzkoa and the Government of Iceland and organized by the Etxepare Institute, the Basque-Finnish Association, the Center for Basque Studies of the University of Nevada, Reno and the Barandiaran Chair of the University of California, Santa Barbara.

$26.00
ISBN 978-1-935709-83-1
SHOP HERE

 

If you’re interested in Basque whaling (and comics), you might also like …

Basque graphic artist’s stunning tale of Joanes, a mythical Basque whaler, and his flying whaleboat.

Joanes 1: The Flying Whaleboat

Joanes 2: Whale Island

Joanes 3: Priest of Pirates

Or buy all 3 together and save!

Running with Iñaki Etxaniz Tesouro and the Basque Love in Reno

Not only in honor of Valentine’s Day, but to show some love from the Center of Basque Studies, one of our new visitor’s, Iñaki Etxaniz Tesouro, decided he would brave the cold weather this last weekend to benefit a local korrika -the Reno Run 4 Love.  Iñaki and I decided to partake in this run that benefited Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada and St. Vincent’s this last Sunday morning.  It was brisk weather to say the least, but with chocolate and champagne waiting for us at the end of the race, we were able to finish strong.

Here is some information about our new arrival from the Basque Country and some good memories already made from before, during, and after our race:

Tell us a bit about yourself and why you are here:

I am Iñaki Etxaniz Tesouro, graduate in History from the University of the Basque Country. After the degree, like many other history students, I decided to do a Master’s in Secondary Education, which is necessary to be able to work as a high school teacher. After finishing this first M.A., I decided to do a second in Contemporary History. All three of my degrees were earned through the University of the Basque Country. I have gone through all three campuses of this university, but if I had to choose, I would stay with Araba’s (Vitoria-Gasteiz) campus, to which I keep a special affection and in which I made great friends.

After finishing this second Master’s degree, I had to decide if I wanted to start as a high school teacher, or if I wanted to do a PhD. I decided to start with a PhD., and in January 2015, the University of The Basque Country granted me with a pre-doctoral contract for the realization of my research. I am in the last year of my PhD program, and hope to present my thesis titled, “The labor crisis and employment policies during the Second Republic: The case of public works in Bizkaia, Gipuzkoa and Araba”, around mid-December.

What brings you to the Center for Basque Studies?

Currently (January 31-April 30), I am doing an international stay at the Center for Basque Studies, at the University of Nevada, Reno where I have coincided with some great PhD students. During the stay at the Center, I will make a comparative analysis between New Deal policies and the employment policies initiated by both the city and provincial councils of Bizkaia, Gipuzkoa, and Araba.

What are some of your hobbies, or things you like to do in your free time?

I will say that my hobbies are mountain climbing, running and reading a good novel (quite typical). Not forgetting to be with friends and people whose company I enjoy. I suppose I will also have to include History among my hobbies.

It’s great to have your energy and enthusiasm here at the Center for Basque Studies, Iñaki (and as a running partner!)  Ongi etorri!

 

 

 

Graduate Student Plans Spring 2018

Check out what our grad students are up to during Spring 2018! Seems like a busy semester!

Ziortza Gandarias

My last semester at the CBS is coming to an end and it is a bittersweet sensation. I am so excited to be presenting my PhD thesis, the project I have been working so hard on. But at the same time I am sad to say goodbye to what it was my life and my home for the last four years. Nevertheless, before that happens I still have some exciting months full of interesting events showing up on the horizon.

Although the semester will be centered mainly on the writing process, I will have a couple of conferences between March and April. I will be presenting a paper in Boise this coming March in the “Memory and Emotion, Women’s Stories: Constructing Meaning from Memory”a conference organized by the world literature department at Boise State University.  I will also be presenting a poster in the “Northern Nevada Diversity: Challenges, Changes, and Solutions: The Reality of Equity and Diversity within Higher Education and the Community”.

Besides my academic projects, I will hopefully be able to enjoy a few days of  hiking and movie dates to keep me motivated and ready to defend my thesis.  Wish me luck!

Edurne Arostegui

This semester will be a wild one indeed. I am happy to have the opportunity to teach “War, Occupation, and Memory in the Basque Borderlands” this term, and even more happy about the number of students enrolled and their interest in the material! Getting to teach reminds me of the reason I’m here: I want to be a professor and love teaching! However, I have other responsibilities to attend to. I’m taking two courses this semester, “History of Women in the United States” and an independent study with Dr. Dworkin at the History department on “Cultural Theory and History.” Luckily, these two courses will keep me on track for my comprehensive exams, which I will be taking at the end of April.

I have a few conferences ahead this semester as well. First off, I’ll be going to Boise for BSU’s Department of World Languages’ “Memory and Emotion. Women’s Stories: Constructing Meaning from Memory” conference this March. I’ll be presenting a paper entitled “Basque Women in the West: Bringing Migrants out of the Shadows,” which will review the historiography on the subject and avenues for further research. In April, I will travel to Santa Barbara for UCSB’s “Verbal Kaleidoscope: First Annual Writers and Scholars in Indigenous Languages and Literatures Conference.” There, I will present a completely different paper entitled “Basque Nationalism with a Punk Voice: The Use of Euskara in Basque Radikal Rock,” a side-project of mine dealing with the renegotiation of Basqueness through musical movements. Later in the summer, I will be traveling to the Basque Country for my field work, and have two conferences lined up: one in Salamanca and the other in Gran Canaria.

My paper “Memoirs of Mobility and Place: Portrayals of Basque-American Identity in Literature of Nevada” has been published in the upcoming book Artes y Diaspora, by Eusko Ikaskuntza. I will also be writing another article on “Gendering the American West” for an edition being published on “América y la emigración Vasca. Procesos de investigación.” Overall, this will be an exciting semester, full of hard work, writing, and research.

Kerri Lesh

This semester I have returned to the Center for Basque Studies and started writing my dissertation after having completed a year of fieldwork in the Basque Country. I am also working as editor to turn the panel I organized for the 116th American Anthropological Association into a special edition for a journal with my fellow panelists. I will attend a conference in March titled “Memory and Emotion, Women’s Stories: Constructing Meaning from Memory”, and am preparing a panel for the Association for the Study of Food and Society conference this summer. Last year was one of the most exciting years on the books, but I look forward to finding more insight into my research as I continue with the writing process and complete my dissertation at the end of this year.

Marsha Hunter

This semester, in addition to a Basque Culture class, with Dr. Irujo’s guidance, I have expanded my coursework to include a Political Science class. Politics is a main area in the development of my thesis and additional courses in this department will be taken over the next several semesters. In addition to class, I plan to travel to Boise for archival research at the Basque Museum and Idaho Historical Museum. Eskerrik asko!

Horohito Norhatan

During the spring 2018 semester, I am teaching PSC 211 “Introduction to Comparative Politics.” In addition, I look forward to defending my dissertation on April 2018. This semester, I am also applying to PhD program in several universities including UNR. My research interests lie in the areas of community economic development, cooperative movement, sustainable development, comparative politics, and international relations. I have dedicated much of my time and energy to refine my understanding of the cooperative concept and its socio-economic potential through my ongoing research agenda at the University of Nevada.

 

 

We are doing exciting things indeed! If you’d like to be part of our lively international cohort, apply for the Basque Tutorial Ph.D. today!

The Tutorial Ph.D. in Basque Studies provides students in the humanities and social sciences with an opportunity to pursue doctoral studies through course work and research for the dissertation. Applicants should hold a Master’s degree in a relevant discipline. For more information, see:

Recruitment-Flyer-Basque-PHD

 

Grad Student News: Edurne Arostegui

 

Last time we checked in on me,  I was finishing up my first semester at UNR. During the spring, I went to the East Coast with Amaia Iraizoz, presenting at the Southern American Studies conference, as well as visiting with the diaspora in Washington D.C. and New York City. Later that month, I presented at the Northern Nevada Diversity Summit and gave a passionate speech for the Unity in Diversity event held by UNR’s GSA. My article, “Memoirs of Mobility and Place: Portrayals of Basque-American Identity in Literature of Nevada,” was published at the end of October by Eusko Ikaskuntza in the new book on Art and Diaspora.

After getting through the year at the CBS, I spent the summer working for the Center for Basque Studies Books, translating new entries for the upcoming edition of Basques in the United States. This semester, I’m still  coordinating the blog as well as the seminar series, having lectured in September on “Basque Women in the West: Bringing Migrants out of the Shadows.” I have also been a guest lecturer in Dr. Vaczi’s classes and am TAing for Dr. Ott’s “Basque Culture” class, focusing on diaspora. UNR also piloted a new program for grad students, ACUE’s Effective Teaching Practices, and I got the chance to participate, finishing up the course this week.

Much of my time has also been spent organizing the WSFH conference with Dr. Ott. After having attended many conferences, I finally realized the work that goes into it, but it was well worth the effort. Speaking of conferences, I’m organizing my schedule for next year, which is looking hectic. However, Dr. Ott has given me the chance to teach “War, Occupation, and Memory” next semester, so I’m looking forward to teaching.

Time flies during doctoral studies, but I’m  taking advantage of every moment I can get!

Grad Student News: Horohito Norhatan

Horohito Norhatan is a graduate student at the Center for Basque Studies, University of Nevada, Reno. Throughout his research, he has had the opportunity to investigate the impact of the cooperative business model on poverty eradication and job creation in the Basque region.

During the 2016-2017 academic year, he taught PSC 211, “Introduction to Comparative Politics.” He plans to teach courses including International Relations, Basque Political Systems, and Basque Cooperativism during the upcoming academic year.

During his tenure as a graduate student at the University of Nevada, Reno, Horohito has taken deliberate action to perfect his research by submitting academic papers and participating in academic conferences pertaining to his research topic. He has participated in several CLAGS (College of Liberal Arts Graduate Symposium) on economic development and cooperation. As a concrete accumulation of his research experience, he has also submitted several manuscripts to major scholarly journals including Economic and Industrial Democracy, the Community Development Journal, Economy Society, the Journal of Co-operative Organization and Management, and the Journal of Comparative Economics.

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