Category: Uncategorized (page 1 of 9)

The Civil War in Enkarterri

Enkarterri Museoa inaugurated on June 2 an exhibition with 70 illustrations of newspapers of different ideologies during the War of 1936, and held a conference about this period in Bizkaia.

The president of the parliament of Bizkaia, Ana Otadui, opened the exhibition “Cartoonists at war. 1936-1939”. Historian and illustrator Aline Soberon, and historian Txema Uriarte are the authors of this exhibition that aims to “reflect the warlike conflict from another point of view”. Each of the 70 illustrations was redrawn by Aline Soberon, following the original technique. The exhibition will remain open until October 14.

   

At 11:30, the museum hosted the conference titled “Civil War in Enkarterri”, organized by the Enkarterri Museum with the presence – among others – of researchers Aitor Miñambres, Xabier Irujo and Jone M. Gil, who spoke about the War of 1936 in this region of Bizkaia. Xabier Irujo spoke about the German, Italian and Spanish air forces’ terror bombing campaign in Enkarterri.

The conference schedule was the following:

11:30 Inauguration of the exhibition “Cartoonists in war. 1936-1939 “and congress” Civil War in Las Encartaciones “

12:30 Aitor Miñambres. Civil War in Enkarterri

13:15 Jone M. Gil. Patrimony of the Civil War

13:30 Xabier Irujo. Terror Bombing Campaign in Enkarterri

14:15 Break

15:00 Juan T. Sáez Iturbe “Pikizu”. Enkarterri. Historical memory

15:30 Txomin Etxebarria. Balmaseda. 1936-1937

16:00 Nagore Orella. Galdames. Summer rain

16:30 Javier de la Colina. Sopuerta The war according to their dead

17:00 PM Break

17:30 Josu Gallarreta. Zalla A battle of ten days

18:00 Tasio Munarriz. Portugalete. War and postwar

18:30 Koldo López Grandoso. Barakaldo. Eleven months of resistance

19:00 J.I.R. Waiter. Ortuella. Victims of war

Conference on the Stuka experiment in Maestrat

Conference on the Stuka experiment in Maestrat

Eighty-one years later, the bombing of Gernika is one of the international icons that commemorates the suffering of civilians in the course of wars and, more specifically, the innocent victims of aerial bombardments. The one in Gernika was an unprecedented air attack that, according to the historian Xabier Irujo, caused more than 2,000 victims and was a war experiment in order to test the Koppelwurf bombing system and the new cocktail of explosive and incendiary bombs devised by Wolfram von Richthofen, chief of staff of the Luftwaffe on Basque soil in 1937. Moreover, the bombing was a birthday gift that was supposed to happen for Hitler’s 48th birthday.

The Condor Legion, as the Luftwaffe unit that Hitler sent to Franco was called, carried out other experimental bombings preparing for World War II. One of these experiments was the one that the German air unit carried out in Maestrat (Valencia) in order to put to the test the new dive bomber models Junkers Ju87 Stuka and the new 500 kg bombs. The Condor Legion destroyed four locations in order to measure its effectiveness in May 1938, causing many casualties among civilians.

          

A conference organized by Oscar Vives (University of Valencia) took place on May 25-29, bringing together researchers and historians to study this event, where Xabier Irujo from the University of Nevada, specialist in the bombing of Gernika, participated. The conference also featured Dr. Joan Villarroya, who spoke about Franco’s aviation in Valencia and Catalonia, and Dr. Stefanie Schüler-Springorum from the University of Berlin, who spoke about life during the war of young German pilots. The bombings of other territories such as Alcañiz, Alicante, and Castellón were also discussed, as well as the Battle of Levante. A round table was held to close the conference.

In the course of the conference the producer Docsvalència presented the film titled ‘Stuka Experiment’, which is a documentary that studies what happened in “Castellon’s Gernika” 80 years ago.

 

 

Meet visiting scholar Iñigo Medina from the General Secretary of Foreign Affairs of the Basque Government

Meet visiting scholar Iñigo Medina from the General Secretary of Foreign Affairs of the Basque Government!

My name is Iñigo Medina (Bilbao, 1988) and I am the new intern scholar of the Directorate for the Basque Community Abroad of the General Secretary of Foreign Affairs of the Basque Government. I will work and research in the CBS, here in Reno, until December 2018 or January 2019.

I earned my BA in Philosophy at the UPV/EHU (Donostia-San Sebastian) and I pursued an MA in International Relations in Leioa after that. A language fan, critical thinker and passionate reader, I consider myself just another holistic, curious person. The main topics I have researched concerned culture, language, technology and the environment, which I mostly approached from a philosophical point of view. I really enjoy playing Basque handball (eskupilota) with friends in an amateur mood, which is why I am planning a potential visit to Elko or San Francisco!

I landed in Reno during the second week of May, although I have visit the CBS before in February, when our Department representatives from the Basque Government were here making an official visit. The CBS group has made everything so easy to me from the first moment, I must say I am so grateful to all them.

Reno shocked me as city and somehow, I said to myself, I liked it. From what I have seen so far, it is a paradoxical place with his gambling tradition on the one hand, and this marvelous University campus with its own Basque Library on the other hand, which amazed me from the first moment. A home to Basque people due to its sheep herding and boarding houses, Reno represents a different narrative elongation of Basque culture, which I never expected before. Reno seems to be mix of natural environment and urban enclave, sheltered by those magnificent mountains which could represent a truly menacing expression of “Physis,” and the oasis archetype engulfed in “Polis” with its vivid downtown and its top academic campus.

My primary duties within the CBS will be helping and assisting the Diaspora Department of Lehendakaritza/Presidency of the Basque Government under the leadership of its Director Gorka Alvarez Aranburu. I will help manage relationships with all the registered Basque Clubs in North America (USA, Canada and Mexico). This includes a close following of the different realities people experience here, and learning about the strenghs and weaknesses, threats and opportunities of the aforementioned Basque Clubs. The will aim to establish a direct communication link between institutions, while also acquiring knowledge and doing research about the Basque diaspora.

Nowadays, the Department which I work for handles different grants and mobility programs aimed for all the Basque Clubs around the world (up to 190 centers and around 30 thousand registered members) mainly related with Basque culture, Basque associationism, institutions, and aiding citizenship matters. These programs pursue the goal of perpetuating and supporting Basque culture overseas, and forging relations between people who share Basque identity, while they live in so different latitudes. Because of its symbolic importance, the Basque Diaspora is well known as the “zortzigarren lurraldea,”the “eight territory” in Euskara, of our historical geography.

As time goes by and if my schedule allows, I would be glad to discover  the city a bit more including its surrounding areas, the Riverside and maybe hiking routes, visit some other towns in the area, meet different people, collaborate with the CBS in any of their research programs, or even participate in some conferences or attend classes at the UNR, if possible.

 

Txakolina Fest at Craft Wine and Beer

Mural design and photo by Erik Burke

I like to think of myself as an unofficial ambassador for the Basque wine, Txakolina. Apart from making it a chapter of my dissertation, which demonstrates how Euskara is used to market locally produced foods, I also just love drinking it. So, when this libation is celebrated right here in Reno at Craft Wine and Beer, it’s time to make some noise!

This year, Craft Wine and Beer’s Txakolina Fest will be on Friday, May 25th from 5-9pm. Ty Martin and his crew put on this Basque-inspired event, and seem to amp it up every year.  Here is his sneak preview of what is to come this Friday:

Between graduation parties, the first BBQ’s of the season, and all the yard work (so much yard work), we also cram in a bunch of seasonal events, and my favorite event we do might just be TXAKOLINA FEST! It’s always a hustle to get the fresh vintage of our favorite Basques wines to Reno before everyone checks out for summer, but the stars aligned this year. For your sampling pleasure, we’ll be pouring AT LEAST six Txakolina from Bizkaia, Getaria, and Alava alongside various Basque ciders. Glasses can be had all evening on Friday, May 25th, from 5pm until close with a more formal(ish) flight offering from 5p-7p. We will also smoke some chorizo from Villa Basque down Carson way. Rumor has it that some dancers from Zazpiak Bat may be just loose enough by the evening to cut a rug and show you a few steps. Lastly, in the spirit of Basque competition, we’ll have a “Best Porron Pouring” contest and lots of dancing as the night wears on. Ladies, bring your best war cry!

For the oenophiles and foodies out there who would like to learn more about this Basque wine, check out the headlines that list several must-try “Txakolinak“:

Decanter’sTxakoli: The Spanish wine style you need to try in 2018

Food and Wine’sThirty Roses to drink this summer

Forbes’ Txakoli: The Choice Wine for Spring Sipping

Hope to see you all at Craft Wine and Beer this Friday for some Txakolina sippin’!

 

 

Gaztemundu 2018 Applications Now Available!

By Kate Camino for Astero:

Gaztemundu 2018

The Resolution for Gaztemundu 2018, was published this week in the Official Bulletin of the Basque Country. This publication triggers the application period for the program that will run September 1-16, 2018 in Vitoria-Gasteiz aimed at individuals between the ages of 18-35 from officially recognized Basque clubs around the world. This year’s Gaztemundu will focus on traditional Basque dance. Eligible applicants will have knowledge of dance instruction and Basque dance, will be of age by January 1, 2018, and will not have participated in a prior edition of Gaztemundu since 2003. See basic requirements here. Applications require submitting a video recording of dance instruction to determine the capability of the individual to interpret, as well as explain the significance of a chosen dance. The jury will also take into consideration other points that are included in this article found on EuskalKultura.com. The deadline to apply is June 18th, and the Resolution is available herein both Basque and Spanish. For clarifications in English, please email: Iñigo Medina. Iñigo recently arrived at the Center for Basque Studies in Reno and will be carrying out a Basque Government internship, from the Directorate for Basque Communities Abroad, through January 2019. Iñigo has a wonderful command of the English language and so for questions about Gaztemundu, or any other Basque Government related issue, feel free to contact him. On behalf of everyone at NABO, we would like to extend a very warm welcome to Iñigo!

CBS Graduate Student Edurne Arostegui Receives Outstanding Graduate Student Scholarship

CBS graduate student Edurne Arostegui receives Outstanding Graduate Student Scholarship!

The Graduate Student Association offers the Outstanding Graduate Student Scholarship to outstanding, full-time graduate students. The scholarship is judged based on a faculty recommendation letter, a personal statement, scholarly work, and extracurricular activities completed during enrollment in a degree program as a University of Nevada, Reno graduate student. The Outstanding Graduate Student Scholarship is for $1,000. Applicants for this scholarship must be registered, full-time graduate students in good academic standing at the time of application. Applicants must be enrolled for the upcoming Fall semester in order to receive the scholarship.

Edurne also just completed her Comprehensive Exams, and as ABD, ready to go for fieldwork, and write her dissertation. Zorionak Edurne!

 

CBS Graduate Student Horohito Norhatan Successfully Defends PhD Dissertation

CBS grad student Horohito Norhatan defended his PhD dissertation yesterday! The title of his dissertation was “The Roles of a Basque-inspired Cooperative in the Community-based Economic Development in Cleveland, Ohio.” Based on mixed methodology including interviews and content analysis, Hito investigated how the Cleveland-based Evergreen Cooperative used the elements of the Mondragón cooperative for its various operations. The PhD committee was chaired by Xabier Irujo from the Center for Basque Studies. Other committee members included Aleksey Kolpakov (Political Science), Xiaoyu Pu (Political Science), Johnson Makoba (Sociology), Mariah Evans (College of Business), and Joseba Zulaika (CBS).

Hito will pursue another PhD degree at the Department of Political Science at UNR. Zorionak Hito, and best of luck in the future!

 

 

Interview to Kiaya Memeo about the Ardi Baltza Dantza Taldea

Interview to Kiaya Memeo 

By Xavier Irujo

When was The Ardi Baltza Dantza Taldea created and how did this initiative happen?

Ardi Baltza was created in 2013 with the purpose of inspiring younger generations to be more connected and involved with the Basque culture.

What is the aim of the group? Why was it created?

The aim of our group is to simply instill passion and create a lifelong love of the Basque culture, whether people are Basque or not.

Weaving emotion and story-telling into their performances, Ardi Baltza aims to capture the mysterious essence of Basque folklore. How is this?

Basque history is both rich in content and at times, mysterious. But, without a connection to it, we lose our sense of Basque identity. Through the various performances Ardi Baltza stages, there is always an underlying Basque story being told, whether it’s telling folktales of the old Pagan religion or more specific historical events, such as the bombing of Gernika. All members find it incredibly important in learning and passing down these stories, creating a strong emotional tie to the Basque culture.

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

The group pulls choreography from both traditional and contemporary Basque dance, along with other classical dance styles, right?

Correct, over the years we have built a bridge into Basque dancing with styles that encourage more youth participation in the U.S. We always respect the “traditional” steps, but are not afraid to put our contemporary twist on things. We have included modern, lyrical, contemporary and ballet in most of our performances.

Ardi Baltza endeavors to inspire future generations to continue the perpetuation and evolution of Basque dancing. How have you thought of promoting the evolution of Basque dancing? What kind of changes or innovation does Ardi Baltza suggest?

We see Basque diaspora in the U.S. as being locked down within a certain time-period that corresponds with the large Basque immigration to the states, while the Basque County itself has naturally been able to evolve over time, including dance and song. While keeping traditional dances in-tact to preserve their history is necessary, these dances will die out if they fail to connect to the younger generations. Ardi Baltza suggests that by constantly learning new dances and songs, marrying traditional with contemporary, along with constant research and knowledge of Basque history, we may find a way to both preserve and perpetuate.

Ardi Baltza has been able to promote these ideals through example, simply having the courage of performing something different than what Basque diaspora in the U.S. deems “traditional” and even “Basque” itself.

Where has Ardi Baltza been featured?

Ardi Baltza has been featured at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, on the TV series “State Plate”, Basque Cultural Day in San Fransisco, the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Boise’s 2015 Jaialdi, and multiple Basque Festivals in the U.S.

What are your plans for the future?

We definitely have our sights set on traveling outside of the U.S. to further our understanding of the Basque culture. We want to experience as much as we can together as a group. Through education, observation, participation and even humanitarian efforts, Ardi Baltza looks forward to an ever-evolving future!

Where can we see Ardi Baltza perform next?

Ardi Baltza will be putting on a fundraiser performance during the NABO convention in Winnemucca on June 8th, 2018. The performance is entitled: Etxea, Memoirs of Gernika. The show features multiple eyewitness accounts of the tragic bombings of Gernika paired with the contemporary and lyrical dance styles of Ardi Baltza. For tickets and more information please visit us on our Facebook page. @ardibaltza 

 

Martin Hotel: Second Location in Carson City

Martin Hotel to Add Second Location in Carson City

Martin HotelThe Martin Hotel in Winnemucca will now open a second location in Carson City. The restaurant’s owner, John Arant, told the Nevada Appeal that Carson City and the Martin would make a good match. The Carson venue will feature the same menu as the Winnemucca restaurant, and the dining rooms will also be identical, including photographs by Linda Dufurrena, and paintings by Gordy Glazier and Teddy Swecker. Arant expects to employ 25 people or so at his new locale. More information about the new restaurant is available in this article in the Nevada Appeal. On Egin!

CBS professor Sandy Ott`s new book gets great reception: Listen to Podcast, read review!

“Succeeds beautifully in describing and analyzing the relations between German occupiers and Basques in a place that in some significant ways stands apart from other regions in France. She brings to life the dramatic and complicated ‘hidden’ story of the German occupation and Vichy collaboration in the Basque Country. Ott`s compelling narrative and thoughtful conclusions nuance what we know about French collaboration with the Nazis during the Vichy years.” John Merriman, Yale University

CBS professor Sandy Ott`s book was recently published by Cambridge University Press, and is getting great reception.

In post-liberation France, the French courts judged the cases of more than one hundred thousand people accused of aiding and abetting the enemy during the Second World War. In her book, Sandy Ott uncovers the hidden history of collaboration in the Pyrenean borderlands of the Basques in southwestern France through nine stories of human folly, uncertainty, ambiguity, ambivalence, desire, vengeance, duplicity, greed, self-interest, opportunism and betrayal. Covering both the occupation and liberation periods, she reveals how the books characters became involved with the occupiers for a variety of reasons, ranging from a desire to settle scores and to gain access to power, money and material rewards, to love, friendship, fear and desperation. These wartime lives and subsequent postwar reckonings provide us with a new lens through which to understand human behavior under the difficult conditions of occupation, and the subsequent search for retribution and justice.

New Books in German Studies created a Podcast interview with Sandy about her work as an anthropologist in the Pyrenees, which goes back to the 1970s; the inception of the idea of the book; her methods, and her relationship with the subjects of her studies. Listen to the interview below:

http://newbooksnetwork.com/sandra-ott-living-with-the-enemy-german-occupation-collaboration-and-justice-in-the-west-pyrenees-1940-1948-cambridge-up-2017/

Furthermore, Shannon L. Fogg from Missouri University of Science and Technology wrote a great review about Living with the Enemy in German Studies Review. As Fogg concludes,

“Living with the Enemy provides a rich and nuanced view of daily life in the French Basque Country and raises interesting questions about postwar justice. Ott does not shy away from the complexity of wartime interactions and explores the complicated, multifaceted, and ambiguous motivations that lay beneath Franco-German relationships. Drawing on historical and ethnographic methods, Sandra Ott has mined the trial dossiers for what they can tell us about the past, but she is also careful to acknowledge their limits. Her own voice as an anthropologist, one who has maintained relationships with Basque locals stretching back to 1976, adds another layer to her analysis and demonstrates the enduring memories of World War II. The end result is a regional study that contributes ‘greatly to our understanding of the choices people made and the factors that motivated them’ (6), as well as to our ideas about collaboration and cohabitation during the war.”

Read the rest of the review here: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/687383

Dr. Ott also received full professorship at the University of Nevada, Reno.

ZORIONAK, Sandy, for your book, interview, review, and for your full professorship!

Older posts