Category: Awards (page 1 of 3)

Anne-Marie Chiramberro Wins Third in Basque Literary Contest

Anne-Marie Chiramberro, a Basque American from the San Francisco Bay Area and author of the blog Hella Basque, has won third in the 2018 Basque Literary Contest for her manuscript “Wannabe Basque”, which is a collection of essays that explores Chiramberro’s experience as a daughter of a Basque immigrant, and navigating being Basque in America and being American in Euskal Herria, a bit of an outlier in both places. “I’m interested in how Basque identity is passed on from Basque immigrants to their American-born children. I wanted to explore that theme in my own life. My father is from the Basque Country and my mother’s family is from the Béarn, the French region just east of the Basque Country,” Chiramberro said, “For years I’ve asked myself: How did I come to feel so strongly Basque and so disconnected from my Béarnais heritage?… This story is me reflecting on my childhood, searching for answers to these questions. I feel they could be useful in helping us to better promote Basque culture and develop Basque identity in the diaspora… Spreading Basque culture is a tool to ensure its survival. The more we disperse Basque culture, the better we will maintain our Basque identities and be understood as a people.”

Interview with Michelle Petitte, Winner of the 2019 CBS Literary Contest

The Center for Basque Studies is pleased to announce the winner of our 2019 Literary Contest is Michelle Petitte, with her story Etxe Roxenia! 

Michelle Petitte

CBS Graduate Student Callie Greenhaw interviewed Michelle to find out more about her and her work.

Please tell us about yourself.

I was born in the French Hospital in Los Angeles and grew up feeling I was French Basque as much as I was American. I visited the Pays Basque with my Amatxi for the first time when I was thirteen and felt the pull of the culture and people. Retirement from my job as an educator two years ago has given me the time and opportunity to explore my cultural legacy and to begin writing Amatxi’s stories.

I live in Southern California and am married with two grown children.

What is Etxe Roxenia about?

Etxe Roxenia tells the true story of Arroxa Caminoa Bidegain, a young Basque girl born in 1864. She grew up in the enclave of Bosate, Spain; her Aita was the town miller. A serious childhood injury set Arroxa’s life on an unexpected path, one that would require espiritu indarra, strength of heart and spirit.

Arroxa was my great-grandmother. The story is written from my memories of the events as told by my Amatxi Lina, as well as notes kept by my mother, Renée. I also researched Basque culture and history, then tried to envision how each scene might have unfolded.

What was the inspiration for your work?

My Amatxi, Lina Bidegain Tauzin, was Basque. She grew up in Urepel, a small village in the Pyrenees mountains in France. She was a story teller. From her favorite spot on the corner of the couch, she shared with her eight grandchildren a lifetime of tales; crossing the Pyrenees on foot at age four, growing up in the village, traveling alone by ship to America at age nineteen. As a child, she was poor in possessions, but rich in family and love, and had a sense of adventure. Her grandchildren loved her stories. Now I am attempting to capture on paper her indomitable spirit, the beauty of her Basque heritage, the changing world that shaped her life.

Please tell us about your other projects.

I have always loved to write. Etxe Roxenia is my first complete narrative story, but I continue to write about Lina’s life. I recently traveled to Montana with my sisters and cousins. We met the family of John Etchart from Aldudes and visited their Stone House Ranch where Lina immigrated to work as a cook for Basque sheepherders in 1916. This is another wonderful chapter of her life, filled with Basque people and experiences.

In order to record Lina’s stories for her grandchildren and great-grandchildren, we created an online blog called The Lina Project, and invited the family to share. It includes Lina’s Legacy pages with information about the Basque culture and historical context, along with Amaxti’s Story pages, short drafts of my memories of her storytelling. My sisters, Kathleen and Tonya, have contributed their own memories to the blog.

Is there anything else you want our readers to know?

Writing my Amatxi’s stories has become a journey of discovery. The more I learn about the Basque culture and people, the more I want to know. Along the way I have met so many interesting and gracious people; they share their own stories and support my aspirations. It has been a wonderful, inspiring experience and has deepened my connection to my Basque heritage

Zorionak, Michelle! Keep a look out in the Center for Basque Studies Bookstore for Etxe Roxenia, coming in May 2019.

CBS Student Kerri Lesh receives Bilinski Fellowship

This semester Center for Basque Studies student, Kerri Lesh, was awarded a Bilinksi Fellowship for 2018-2019 by the College of Liberal Arts. She has been the first student from the Center for Basque Studies to be awarded a Bilinski Fellowship. A reception was held for the eight awardees who were announced May 3rd. Associate Dean Jane Detweiler presented the awards after a short welcome speech provided by Dean Debra Moddelmog. The previous year’s recipients were present to share their work with a poster presentation as they noshed on cookies and fruit.

Kerri was awarded $30,000 to support her in writing her dissertation, which focuses on the use of Euskara alongside the marketing of local gastronomic products of the Basque Country.

Russell J. and Dorothy S. Bilinski’s goal in life was to be independent and challenged intellectually. They strongly believed in people being self-sufficient, ambitious, and above all, responsible. Both Russell and Dorothy were true intellectuals, as well as being adventuresome, independent and driven. Russell was a researcher, academician, and an entrepreneur. Dorothy was an accomplished artist and patron of the arts. Russell and Dorothy believed that education was a means to obtain independence, and this is the legacy they wished to pass on to others.

In furtherance of that goal, when Russell and Dorothy died, they left a significant gift for the formation of a nonprofit corporate foundation. The Bilinski Educational Foundation seeks to fulfill this legacy by providing fellowship funds for post-secondary education for students who have demonstrated, and are likely to maintain, both the highest academic achievement and good moral character, but who lack the financial resources to complete their post-secondary education.

 

CBS Professor Sandy Ott receives Outstanding Service Award from the College of Liberal Arts

Dr. Sandy Ott received Outstanding Service Award from the College of Liberal Arts for her service activities during the 2017/18 academic year. Besides her multiple commitments at the Center for Basque Studies including Director of Graduate Students, Sandy also served as Interim Chair at the Department of Communication. Zorionak Sandy!

 

Dr. Ott was recently interviewed about her new book Living with the Enemy: German Occupation, Collaboration and Justice in the Western Pyrenees, 1940-1948. You can find her podcast here:

http://newbooksnetwork.com/sandra-ott-living-with-the-enemy-german-occupation-collaboration-and-justice-in-the-west-pyrenees-1940-1948-cambridge-up-2017/

 

The Basque film HANDIA is nominated for 13 Goya Awards

 

handia pelicula bilaketarekin bat datozen irudiak

The Basque movie Handia (Giant) has been nominated for 13 Goya awards, including best film, best director, and best script. The Goya Awards are granted annually by the Academy of Arts and Cinematographic Sciences of Spain.

handia pelicula bilaketarekin bat datozen irudiak

The film appears to be quite interesting as it is based on a true story.  The film begins after one of the protagonists, Martin, returns to his family farmhouse in Gipuzkoa after fighting in the First Carlist War. There he discovers that his younger brother, Miguel Joaquín, is much taller than usual. Convinced that everyone will want to pay to see the greatest man on Earth, both brothers embark on a long journey through Europe in which ambition, money, and fame will forever change the destiny of the family.  

handia pelicula bilaketarekin bat datozen irudiak

The film Handia tells the true story of Miguel Joaquin Eleizegi Arteaga, a character who in the mid-nineteenth century was known as the Giant of Alzo. Born in 1819 in the Gipuzkoan town of Alzo, he suffered from acromegaly, a disease caused by a defect in the pituitary gland that causes excessive secretion of growth hormones. Miguel Joaquin came to weigh 467 pounds and measured 7’4 feet tall. Unfortunately, Miguel Joaquin died very young at the age of 43 from tuberculosis.

Gigante de Alzo bilaketarekin bat datozen irudiak

If you want to know more about  Basque Cinema you might like to read the following books: The Basque Nation on Screen: Cinema, Nationalism, and  Political Violence Basque Cinema.

 

 

Monday Movies: “The Great Zambini” by Igor Legarreta and Emilio Pérez

“The Great Zambini is a story that has a touch of sadness but, in the end, we can see some hope in the relationship between father and son.” Emilio Pérez

 

Situated in the middle of the desert, in an almost lunar landscape, a rickety roulette serves as home for a family that lives among the abandoned remains of an old circus. The son (Aníbal Tártalo) is ashamed of the father (Emilio Gavira) because he is a dwarf, and suffers the mockery of the other children. One day the father observes his son`s fascination with an image of the man stepping on the moon for the first time on television. He designs a plan to win his son`s admiration. The difficult relations between the central characters are articulated through their expressive looks that rarely cross, but perfectly condense the emotions that live within each one of them: the son`s shame, the father’s pain, and the mother’s sadness (Esperanza de la Vega), who is torn between the two.

One day the father is waiting for his son at the exit of the school and notices that, in front of him, a little girl is holding on to her mother`s hand, and watches him fixedly. The dwarf man winks, provoking a timid smile from the little one. His own son, however, is incapable of showing any sign of love for his father. He hides in the bathroom until the rest of the students leave because he is ashamed of showing with his dwarf father in public.

The father doesn`t tolerate his disrespect and punishes him by not allowing him to have dinner. The mother, however, who divides her love and understanding between them, brings him a sandwich to the canon, where the child once again hides from his father. The father observes the scene from the door of the mobile home and understands that he must do something in order to recover the love of his son. At this very moment, a fabulous plan is born, and magic erupts into the story, evoking with the magic of the old circus. Zambini relocates and re-furbishes the canon that, until then, served as the hiding place of the embarrassed child. With exquisite subtleness and narrative economy, the filmmakers reveal the father`s plan: resuscitate the old days in the circus, once again light the fuse of the marvelous scene where children`s hopes and dreams become reality, and thus replace the child`s embarrassment with fascination and admiration for his father.

Monday Movies presents Basque short films and contemporary filmmakers. The short films presented here have gained international recognition thanks to the Basque Government`s distribution program Kimuak, and they are part of the CBS`s upcoming book publication Kimuak Short Films: Seeds of Basque Cinema.

Click on the link below to watch the film. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Graduate Dean’s Merit Scholarship: Zorionak Hito and Edurne

UNR’s Graduate School inaugurated a new fellowship and scholarship program for the 2017-2018 academic year. According to Nevada Today, “the Graduate School began offering the fellowships in an effort to recruit and retain highly talented students to the University’s graduate programs.” A reception was held on September 18, and I’m proud to announce that both Hito Norhatan and myself received merit scholarships this year.

Six incoming graduate students were selected for the $35,000 one-year fellowship. All hailing from different countries and academic backgrounds, David Zeh, Dean of the Graduate School, introduced each of them, as we snacked on cheese and crackers, fruit, and more, alongside glasses of champagne. Congratulations Mahamoud Amin Aboukifa, Isayas Berhe Adhanom, Katherine Chang, Grant T. Fairchild, Sarah Anne Moody, and Birendra Rana. I’m sure you will accomplish great things!

The Graduate Dean’s Merit Scholarship was awarded to 30 students, who have already embarked on their studies. The recipients were as varied as those for the fellowship. Hito and I celebrated alongside everyone, and I think we deserved a piece of the cake alongside our champagne flutes. I hope more students from the CBS get nominated for these scholarships. It is our chance to bring Basque Studies to the forefront of research!

Colombian chef Leonor Espinosa wins Basque Culinary World Prize

It was announced today, July 18, that Colombian chef Leonor Espinosa of the Restaurante Leo has won this year’s Basque Culinary World Prize. The prize is awarded by the Basque Culinary Center and the Basque Government and is intended to celebrate, in its own words, Basque “values such as hard work and compromise, the capacity to excel, a vocation for transformation and the creation of equal opportunities for men and women.” In the words of the jury:

We believe that through awarding the prize to Leonor we recognize all those people ho are working hard today so that the city and rural communities can come together through gastronomy. Leonor’s work shows the possibilities that come when chefs acknowledge that biodiversity, ecology, culture, ad the traditions of local communities matter. Her work gives voice to the silence and anonymity of indigenous and Afroamerican cultures. We found this inspiring and powerful.

From the Basque Culinary World Prize website:

Leonor Espinosa is known for taking great pride in the cuisine of her country, as well as nurturing and promoting the value of its biodiversity. Through the Funleo foundation, Espinosa revives the ancestral knowledge and know-how of mainly indigenous and Afro-Colombian peoples. She supports rural development based on food sovereignty, and promotes routes to market for small producers as well as spaces for education, nutrition, enterprise and tourism in ethnic locations. In addition to gathering support for opening a Comprehensive Gastronomy Centre in Chocó as an alternative framework to drug trafficking, she urges Colombia to raise awareness of its culinary richness, and wants its communities to take responsibility for transforming their biological, cultural and intangible heritage into tools for socio-economic development.

Zorionak Leonor!

Winnemucca Euskaldunak Danak Bat Basque Club Scholarship 2017

39th Annual Basque Festival in Winnemucca

While looking through the program for the Winnemucca 2017 Basque Festival, I discovered that the Euskaldunak Danak Bat Basque Club has a yearly scholarship for graduating seniors, going back to 1981. This year, the sisters Tiana Marie and Amaya Michon Herrera have received the award for their studies at UNR. We look forward to a visit from them to the center! Here’s a bit of information on the ahizpak from the program:

Photos from the Festival Program

Tiana Marie Herrera and Amaya Michon Herrera have been dancing with the Winnemucca Irrintzi Dancers since they were three. They have thoroughly enjoyed each and every year of dancing and hope to continue dancing in the years to come at the University of Nevada, Reno. They have enjoyed all of the people that are involved with the Winnemucca Club–their instructors, everyone who has been at a festival or a Christmas Party or a Summer Picnic. They have really enjoyed working with the younger kids on different dances. They will both be attending UNR in the fall, Amaya will be majoring in History and Tiana will be majoring in Elementary Education and hope to pursue a master’s degree in Counseling. Tiana and Amaya are extremely grateful for this scholarship and all of the support they have received from so many people involved with the Winnemucca Euskaldunak Danak Bat.

Zorionak, neskak!

 

 

Major food awards to be held in Bilbao in 2018

It has just been announced that the World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards, considered by many to be the Oscars of global gastronomy, will be held in Bilbao in June 2018.  Quoting the host organization:

Spain’s Basque Country has long been known as one of the most gastronomically blessed regions of the world, with the highest concentration of Michelin-starred restaurants per capita and a strong and enduring representation of restaurants in the 50 Best list. With everything from fine dining to abundant pintxos, it’s the ideal next location for the biggest culinary party on the planet.

The announcement was made at Basque chef Eneko Atxa’s London restaurant Eneko At One Aldwych.

These prestigious awards, which were held annually in London for 13 years before expanding globally to New York in 2016 and Melbourne this year, will thus make their third international port of call in the capital of Bizkaia, thanks to the generous support of the Bizkaiko Foru Aldundia-Diputación Foral de Bizkaia (the Provincial Government of Bizkaia), and we’re sure Basques will be ready for the party!

Read more about the choice of Bilbao as the host venue here.

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