Author: edurne arostegui (page 1 of 6)

Summer fun in the Basque Country

For those of you living in the Basque Country, Eresbil–the National Archive of Basque Music in Errenteria (Gipuzkoa)–has put together a map and website of upcoming music and dance festivals celebrated across Euskal Herria.

Here’s a bit of information about the organization itself, from its website:

ERESBIL comes forth in 1974 as a result of the repertoire needs for programming MUSIKASTE, a week’s festival devoted to the diffusion of works by Basque composers in the town of Errenteria. The initiative for creating a centre, which would gather the works to be spread by the above mentioned festival, is born by the hand of José Luis Ansorena in the bosom of the Choir Andra Mari, the organiser of MUSIKASTE since 1973. During that same year 1974 began the compilation of scores created by Basque composers throughout the time. The first list of composers, comprising up to 300 names, is made up in September. On 31st December 2008, ERESBIL had already identified 1.775 authors as Basque-navarraise composers.

Be sure to check out the concerts, which kick off on Thursday in Urkizu, near Tolosa, with the group Et Incarnatus to celebrate the summer solstice. To learn more, be sure to read “Eresbil publishes a guide and map of music and dance festivals for summer 2017 in the Basque Country online” by Euskal Kultura.

Winnemucca Euskaldunak Danak Bat Basque Club Scholarship 2017

39th Annual Basque Festival in Winnemucca

While looking through the program for the Winnemucca 2017 Basque Festival, I discovered that the Euskaldunak Danak Bat Basque Club has a yearly scholarship for graduating seniors, going back to 1981. This year, the sisters Tiana Marie and Amaya Michon Herrera have received the award for their studies at UNR. We look forward to a visit from them to the center! Here’s a bit of information on the ahizpak from the program:

Photos from the Festival Program

Tiana Marie Herrera and Amaya Michon Herrera have been dancing with the Winnemucca Irrintzi Dancers since they were three. They have thoroughly enjoyed each and every year of dancing and hope to continue dancing in the years to come at the University of Nevada, Reno. They have enjoyed all of the people that are involved with the Winnemucca Club–their instructors, everyone who has been at a festival or a Christmas Party or a Summer Picnic. They have really enjoyed working with the younger kids on different dances. They will both be attending UNR in the fall, Amaya will be majoring in History and Tiana will be majoring in Elementary Education and hope to pursue a master’s degree in Counseling. Tiana and Amaya are extremely grateful for this scholarship and all of the support they have received from so many people involved with the Winnemucca Euskaldunak Danak Bat.

Zorionak, neskak!

 

 

Lagunak Tour

Today, a small group of Basque-Americans will leave to the Basque Country to reconnect with their roots. I recently spoke to Florence Larraneta Frye, who organizes the Basque Women’s Luncheon I wrote about a few months back, about the trip.  Each laguna (friend) first had a family tree put together by Lisa Corcostegui (check out her website), and the itinerary was then designed around it. They will travel to their ancestral homes to visit their roots from the source. As Frye noted, “They see, and know they are indeed Basque, with pride that they can validate.”
The tour itself is composed of all things Basque, flexible within the 10 days they’ll be abroad on this intensely personal trip. Frye commented on the initiative:
As our Lagunak luncheon grew in size, it was not surprising to me that I realized how comfortable and bonded these women were–almost like joining a family reunion of relatives for the first time.  The noise and chatter was deafening, a Basque tradition I remember always, when Basques meet Basques!

I also sadly noticed some women feel only slightly Basque and not worthy to even to come to our luncheon as they are, say, 1/8th Basque… but all women of Basque decent are welcome to our luncheon.  We have name tags, they write their names, and also their Basque names, they always know that, and feel a great sense of pride for their Basque (grandfather, etc) name. We are a very proud culture, our blood line is diluting, and will be more so as time goes on…this diaspora is “falling between the cracks.”

What a life changing gift for many that only felt Basque because someone told them, now they have a picture in their minds and know they are indeed Basque. This first tour will be an experiment of what we will change in the future for our ladies.  My friends from Euskadi make me feel like I belong, and I hope to accomplish this for my lagunak.

We look forward to hearing more about the trip. Sorte eta bidaia on!

 

Winnemucca Basque Festival

Continuing on our summer Basque Festival tour of the West, some of us at the CBS and Jon Bilbao Basque Library had the chance to visit Winnemucca and attend its 39th Annual Basque Festival. Once again, we got up early (but thankfully not as early as the weekend before) and set off east toward Winnemucca. On the way there, we had a lovely breakfast in Lovelock!

Cowpoke Cafe in Lovelock

Mmm…breakfast

Once in Winnemucca, we watched the Basque Festival Parade. Many of the dance groups and clubs had floats parade down Winnemucca Blvd. The local fire and police department were also present. It seemed as if all of the town had gone out to watch the parade, and the children were giddy with excitement over the candy being thrown to them from all of the participants.

Parade

More parading!

Next up, we headed to the convention center. Right outside, on the Nixon Lawn, festival goers had set up for the picnic, and everywhere you looked, you could see young boys and girls dressed in their traditional outfits ready to have fun.

Txiki dancers

Inside the convention center, everyone was buying tickets for the lunch and merriment. The Boise Basque Museum had set up a table with various gift items and souvenirs. Our Basque Books Editor was also present with a display of our many publications and eager buyers.

Inside the Convention Center

Our Basque Books Editor!

Before the eating began, the national anthems were sung and dance performances kicked off the event. Throughout the day, various groups danced and competitions were held. Among them, dance-offs and weight lifting competitions. A professional wood chopping display was the highlight for me. Stephanie Braña did a great job! To learn more about her, see the following article in Euskal Kazeta.

Dantzaris

Wood-chopping

Lunch was delicious! We had salad, beans, lamb stew, and steak, accompanied by wine and bread. Hats off to the cooks! We then had the chance to watch more performances but left before the concerts began. Too bad we couldn’t stick around!

Lunch!

Once again, these Basque festivals and picnics do not disappoint! Not only was it a lovely day in the sun, but we were surrounded by fun people and entertainment. Can’t wait till the next one!

Nothing like the Nevada views

Photo credits: Edurne Arostegui, Iñaki Arrieta-Baro, and Irati Urkitza.

An update from Irati Urkitza, our Basque Library Intern

We here at the blog have decided to check up on Irati Urkitza, who you may have read about in a previous post. The following is an update from the Algortarra, who we are happy to have here at the Jon Bilbao Basque Library and at the Center for Basque Studies. She is doing a tremendous amount of work in the archive and it’s a pleasure seeing her every day.

Five months have passed since I landed in Reno and I couldn’t be happier! First off, this is my first experience related to working in archives so I had a lot to learn. When I arrived, I had the opportunity to familiarize myself with the archives and the materials in them. I couldn’t believe how interesting they are. I’ve found all kinds of documents, some dealing with exile, others with the first sheepherders in the West as well as boardinghouses, and the personal stories behind all of them. On example is the story of the migrant to Colombia “El Cojo” Gómez, who happened to be from my hometown, Algorta. He was a “good” smuggler in the sense that he told on “bad” people, even though he was murdered in retaliation for having killed three men. This is just one of the many stories hidden in the archives of the Jon Bilbao Basque Library.

After the process of getting to know the materials, I received training from the library staff in various programs that I’ve been using to catalog archival documents. I think it’s wonderful that they spend time teaching new interns not just how to use the programs but also helping us throughout the way. I still have questions sometimes, but I think I’ve learned quite a bit.

One of the tasks I carry out here besides cataloging is working at the library by attending to visitors and students. It is also my first time working with the public in this way, and I think I’ve improved a lot since I first sat in front of the main desk. Most of the people who come are interested in learning what we do at this library as well as Basque culture and history. Others come because of their interest in their backgrounds, thinking they may have Basque ancestors. We also get a lot of students because our library is quieter than the main library.

We currently have a window exhibit on the bombing of Gernika that I helped to put together. Not only did I record one of the testimonies, that of Mercedes Irala, but I also helped to translate the texts and edit the video on display. The Gernika exhibit is just a small homage to this historic event, but I think it’s important for the diaspora to remember the events that marked our grandparent’s generation.

For now, I’m continuing to discover new treasures that were forgotten in the many boxes that comprise the archive. I’m trying to figure out what it is we have exactly and see if we can create new collections for cataloging. As you can see, I’m working hard and enjoying every minute of it.

Besides working at the library, I’ve had the chance to get to know Reno as well as its surroundings and people. For example, I spent a wonderful weekend at Black Rock Desert for the rendezvous organized by Friends of the Nevada Wilderness and Friends of BRD. I also had the chance to attend the Basque Picnic in Petaluma (CA), which was a way for me to take part in the Basque-American experience. I look forward to traveling more across the West.

Before I end this post, I just wanted to thank everyone at the Basque Library and in the Main Library for giving me this opportunity, especially Iñaki Arrieta-Baro, the Basque librarian, who has to deal with me every day and answer all of my questions. Mila esker!

An Interview with Marta Requejo Fraile, a visiting scholar from the University of Valladolid

Marta Requejo Fraile is a visiting Ph.D. student here at the CBS from the University of Valladolid. After spending a few weeks in Reno, we’ve decided to interview her on her research and stay. She’s a great addition to our summer visiting scholars and we look forward to reading her work.

Marta is from Miranda de Ebro (Burgos) and has a B.A. in Journalism and a Master’s in “Research in Communication as a Socio-historical Agent” (Master en Investigación de la comunicación como agente historico-social), both from the University of Valladolid. She began her Ph.D. in 2014, within the program “Spanish: Linguistics, Literature, and Communication” at the same university. She is funded by a Spanish government grant for University Professor Training (Formación del Profesorado Universitario) and also received the Begoña Aretxaga Travel Stipend for her research stay here.

Marta has been working hard at the library and recently presented her dissertation topic at on of our seminars. Here’s a look into her background and work.

1)    What brings you to the Center for Basque Studies? 

The first time I heard about the CBS was in a scholarly article that I was reading for my doctoral dissertation. After that, I have found it cited more and more in most of the works I reviewed. So, I thought it could be useful for my research project to come here because of the Center’s resources. I am going to be here for three months

2)    What is the goal of your project?

I study the role of mass media in conflict resolution, specifically, the Basque case through the analysis of discourse in some Basque newspapers.

3)    What makes your research unique? 

I use Peace and Conflict Research theories to analyze media discourse in the Basque case, something that is not very common in Communication Studies and even less in the Spanish academic world.

4)    What have you accomplished since you arrived?

I have divided my time at the CBS between the empirical analyses of my dissertation and the study of anthropological aspects of terrorism in media discourse in some reference works.

5)  Has the Center for Basque Studies helped you in any way?

Over and above the diversity of the bibliographic resources that the Center for Basque Studies owns about Basque issues, what makes this institution unique, apart from the place in which it is located, is the people that work in it. I think that it is one of the most important forms of support that I have found here.

6)    Are you enjoying the U.S.?

It is an amazing place that makes you feel as if you were trapped in a film in continual progress. I would have never imagined this.

7)    What have you missed the most since you’ve been here?

Although it sounds like a cliché, we always miss that which is irreplaceable in our lives, like close people. And, in this sense, I think I have not been the exception.

An Interview with Beñat Dachaguer

As many of you know, we have quite a few visitors throughout the year. In this interview, we introduce you to Beñat Dachaguer, who is doing an internship at the library.

1) Tell me a bit about yourself…

My name is Beñat Dachaguer and I come from Bayonne in the French Basque Country. During this 2016-2017 school year, I am studying Books and Heritage Professions at Grenoble University. Before that, I taught English in high schools for 10 years.

2)    What brings you to the Center for Basque Studies?

For this training course in Books and Heritage Professions, I needed to do a 2-month internship in a library. I am very interested in Basque culture, language, and literature. I applied to the Basque Library and they accepted me as an intern for 2 months. I am here until June 30.

3)    What is the goal of your project?

The purpose of my stay at the Basque Library is to understand the procedures of the Basque Library in the framework of a North American research library. Thanks to this internship, I am also able to gain knowledge about the Library’s archival collections and the holdings in general.

4)    What makes your study unique?

I speak Basque as my mother tongue and as a fully-quaIified English teacher, I am also fluent in English. The internship allows me to learn more about the Basque diaspora and Basque-American identity. It is interesting to see how they manage to keep Basque culture and traditions alive.

5)    What have you accomplished since you arrived?

I enjoy the city of Reno. I think it is a lively and pleasant town where there are many things to do: restaurants, cinema, pubs, casinos…  and of course, I have gone to Louis’ Basque Corner, the Basque restaurant downtown and visited the National Monument to the Basque Sheepherder. I also went to Pyramid Lake, which I found beautiful!

6)  Has the Center for Basque Studies and Library helped you in any way?

The Center for Basque Studies has helped me a lot. There are many interesting documents about Basque culture and diaspora. I have to write a report about my stay at the Basque Library, so all the materials available are very useful to me. Besides, the colleagues (library staff, faculty, and Ph.D. students) are really nice. There is a good atmosphere in the library.

7)    Are you enjoying the U.S.?

I enjoy the USA, mainly the Western part. Nevada and California are states where there is a good life quality. I already went to Chino, near Los Angeles, 20 years ago and I have kept an excellent memory of my stay there! I am glad to be back in the USA.

8)    What have you missed the most since you’ve been here?

I haven’t really missed anything except one thing maybe … actually, in April and May, I usually have fun at Basque festivals like Nafarroaren Eguna in Baigorri or Herri Urrats in Senpere. But this year I was in Reno … so I couldn’t attend these 2 events. However, last weekend, I went to the Basque picnic in Bakersfield, California. It was like being at home, in the Basque Country…I even discovered two new drinks:  Madras and VO+sprite. Next weekend, I am going to visit San Francisco and attend the local Basque picnic there… the show must go on!

SFBC Annual Basque Picnic in Petaluma

Last Sunday, a few of us from the Center for Basque Studies and the Jon Bilbao Basque Library made the trip out to Petaluma for the San Francisco Basque Club’s 57th Annual Picnic. After heading out rather early, we made it to the end of the mass given by Father Lastiri, with music by the Elgarrekin Choir and the Zazpiak Bat Klika, alongside dancing. The Petaluma Fair Grounds were packed, and finding a table was a difficult task. While the chefs prepared the barbecue, we enjoyed the warm weather and pleasant conversation. Even my own parents made it out!

As with all Basque events, food was plentiful. We dug into some cheese and other appetizers until the line formed to stack our plates with the wonderful food provided by the SFBC. The menu consisted of barbecued rack of lamb (cooked perfectly) with beans, piperade, salad, cheese, bread, and of course, wine. Every bite was delicious. After our dessert, we gathered around the court to watch the dancers.

Zazpiak Bat Dancers

First came the Zazpiak Bat Txiki dancers, who did a splendid job considering that this was the first year of dancing for most. The Los Banos group was represented by 3 young boys, who also had some great moves. Lastly, we watched the Zazpiak Bat Dance group dance elegantly. The Klika also partook in the jovial atmosphere. Overall, it was a great time.

As picnic and festival season begins, I hope to attend more events. It’s great to see Basque culture being carried on by the youth and the many Basques and Basque-Americans that come together to share food, fun, and merriment. Don’t forget, next week: Winnemucca’s Annual Festival!

Interview with Mikel Amuriza, visiting scholar from the Diputación de Bizkaia

After a three-month research stay, we’ve decided to interview Mikel Amuriza, a visiting scholar from the Diputación de Bizkaia. He has been quite the presence around the CBS and we will miss him dearly.

Mikel Amuriza Fernandez was born in Bilbao in 1978 and studied “Ciencias Actuariales y Financieras” (like Business but more specialized in insurance) at the University of the Basque Country. He currently works at the Biscay Deputation, in the tax inspection department.

1)    What brings you to the Center for Basque Studies? How long will you be here?

The Biscay Deputation and the CBS have an agreement for cooperation and to promote the Basque Economic Agreement, so I got the opportunity to spend three months here.

2)    What is the goal of your project?

The main goal of my project is to analyze the American tax system to compare it with the Basque Country tax system.

3)    What makes your research unique?

 It is unique, at least for me, because there isn’t a comparative model of the two systems. It is also a great opportunity to experience this Basque Center, learn a little bit about Basque culture and history in the United States, experience American culture, and, of course, to work on the article on this subject.

4)    What have you accomplished since you arrived?

I have learned a lot about American society,  culture, and its economic system. And I also have learned about the Basque diaspora and its history.

5) Has the Center for Basque Studies helped you in any way?

In many ways: The library’s resources, the incredible people at the CBS, tools to work efficiently like a computer, office, the internet, etc., they have all helped me in my research stay. Also, related to my job, the Nevada Tax office, lawyers, and UNR professors have also aided me tremendously.

But the most important help has been from the people at the center.

6)    Are you enjoying the U.S.?

It has been an amazing experience, so if I can, I will come back, of course! 

7)    What have you missed the most since you’ve been here?

My family and my young son Martin.

Kalimotxo: Tradition vs. Pepsi

Today we bring you a post on Kalimotxo, the delicious and refreshing drink that’s popular throughout the Basque Country and is making its way into the United States. For those of you who are unfamiliar with the beverage, it consists of equal parts wine and cola, although the ratios vary by person (I personally like 70:30, wine:coke). I know, you must be thinking, this is outrageous! I propose you try it before making up your mind, especially now that we’re finally getting a taste of summer, at last!

Image Credit: Marie Claire Magazine

The origin of kalimotxo is said to have its roots in Algorta’s Puerto Viejo (Getxo, Bizkaia) during its jaiak (fiestas) in 1972. The story goes that the kuadrilla “Antzarrak” had purchased 2,000 liters of wine to serve at its txosna (bar stands run by groups of friends during fiestas). They soon discovered that the wine had gone bad. However, they were not in the position to buy more, so after several mixes, they came up with equal parts wine and coke. The question was, how were they going to market it? Two of the kuadrilla members were nicknamed Kali (short for Kalimero) and Motxo (Motxorra). They put the two together and voilá, kalimotxo was born.

Puerto Viejo, Image Credit: Daniel Defco, Creative Commons

The reason we bring you this story today is not only to encourage you to take a break and have a drink, but because kalimotxo is slowly gaining fame throughout the world. In fact, Pepsi has come out with a new product in the United States: Pepsi 1893. It is meant to be the perfect pairing to wine. Check out their promotional video on Twitter:

https://twitter.com/pepsi/status/856945990208761861

This glamorous new take on kalimotxo goes hand in hand with the following article from The New York Times, which even includes a video and recipe:

Wine and Cola? It Works

Some might consider the kalimotxo (pronounced cal-ee-MO-cho) a guilty pleasure; I’ve received more than a few skeptical glances when I’ve ordered it at bars in New York. But I don’t feel an iota of contrition when I drink this Basque-country classic. It couldn’t be easier: equal parts red wine (some say the cheaper the better, but that’s up to you) and cola. I like a squeeze of lemon juice for a little brightness, and maybe a slice of lemon or orange to dress it up. But purists might consider even those modest additions a little fussy. The overall effect is surprisingly sangria-esque, minus all that fruit-chopping and waiting, and wonderfully refreshing.

If you can find cola made with cane sugar rather than corn syrup, all the better, but the drink is still fine with whatever you’ve got on hand. The soda’s caffeine actually makes the kalimotxo a fine pick-me-up: an ideal afternoon drink when you know you’ve still got a long day, and night, ahead.

In a glass filled with ice, combine 3 or 4 ounces dry red wine (preferably Spanish) with an equal amount of cola and 1 squeeze lemon juice. Garnish with a lemon or orange slice to serve.

By Rosie Shaap: May 20, 2013

Well, in spite of all the hype, I’m a traditionalist. The best kalimotxos are made from cheap wine (in the Basque Country either Don Simon or Eroski’s own red wine) and are best served with a group of friends on any night, evening, or afternoon. Give it a try, I’m sure you won’t be disappointed!

For more about kalimotxo and its history, check out the following videos (in Spanish) and book (also in Spanish and available for download at the Getxo City Hall’s website):

“El verdadero origen del Kalimotxo”, EITB

“El origen del kalimotxo”, La Noche De, EITB

El invento del kalimotxo y anécdotas de las fiestas, by Antzarrak: http://www.getxo.eus/es/turismo/descubre-getxo/origen-kalimotxo (scroll to the bottom of the page for download)

 

Older posts