Author: csauvageau (page 1 of 2)

Basque Women’s Book Club

A group of four Basque women have created a Basque book club, starring the books The Center for Basque Studies Press. So far, they have read A Man Called Aita and My Mama Marie, each a collection of stories by Joan Errea about growing up in rural Nevada with her parents Marie Jeanne and Arnaud Paris, both immigrants from Euskal Herria. They have also read At Midnight by Javier Arzuaga, a memoir of a young Basque priest whose parish was in La Cabaña, the fortress where the accomplices of the disposed dictator who had not fled after the Cuban Revolution were held, and later executed between Feburary and May of 1959.

“Our book group was started by us wanting to read these particular books, and talking about them”, said Florence Frye, the head of the book club. Frye also said that they are deciding on a new book from the CBS Press soon. If you are interested in joining the book club or have any questions, please contact Florence Frye at: nevadalovestory@gmail.com, and look out for the press’s new releases for Spring 2019 at: https://basquebooks.com/.

                          

2019 Basque Writing Contest

The 2019 Basque Writing Contest is here! We are accepting manuscripts starting Friday to basquestudies@gmail.com. We look forward to seeing all your wonderful literary works and good luck!

 

 


James Barayasarra Wins Second in Basque Literary Contest

James Barayasarra has won second prize in the 2018 Basque Literary Contest for his manuscript “Seven Wagons and a Half”, a hilarious and touching tale about growing up as the middle child of Basque immigrants Nemesio and Victorina Barayasarra.

“…[M]y parents did not have a high level of education, they were self-taught, were proud of their Basque heritage and American citizenship. They experienced many hardships, including poverty and discrimination, and yet they survived. It was tough, but I wouldn’t trade any of the events for all the towers in the world. I mean we were poor, discriminated against, but we made it through and I can live to tell about it. I have taught my offspring about my heritage and hope they will appreciate their Basque heritage and sacrifices of immigrants like Nemesio & Victorina Barayasarra,” Barayasarra said when asked about his inspiration for “Seven Wagons and a Half”, “The story is about the attempt to record the contributions of an immigrant family, such as Nemesio & Victorina. Even though they had challenges and struggled at times, they survived the hardest times. It is about appreciation of their hard work and to honor them for their sacrifices.”

James Barayasarra

James Barayasarra

Since his teaching days at high school level in Idaho and Nevada, teaching as well at SUNY Alfred State and Chesapeake College, having received a Bachelor’s of Science in Biology and Master’s of Education from the College of Idaho, as well as a Masters in Natural Sciences from the University of Idaho; and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Biology from Saint Bonaventure University, Barayasarra has “ taken approximately 40 hours of theatre, creative writing, and art…[and has] 9 unpublished work plays, one that has been performed on stage, thank you very much”.

CBS Press Welcomes 2019 with Many Changes

CBS Press has had a very eventful 2018, from ranking 87 in the Scholarly Publish Indicators (compared to our 248 ranking in 2014) to beginning making changes to the way we that will publish and distribute our books, changes that will carry on to 2019. We are beginning to collaborate with the University of Nevada Press in our marketing and distribution process, allowing us to reach a broader audience with our books. In addition, we are beginning to involve authors in promoting the titles they have written. We have already started doing this with books such as Lekuak: The Basque Places of Boise by Meggan Laxalt Mackey and Zelestina Urza in Outer Space by David Romtvedt.

Along with the changes in our marketing and distribution, our designing and editing process is going through some great changes in 2019 with Cameron Watson becoming head editor, in charge of translating and proofreading all our manuscripts. Juan San Martin is now head designer, collaborating with artists to create our books’ covers.

As well as the changes we will experience in the way we make our books, we are also very excited to announce that we will be releasing new series to our collections, a Basque music series that will be edited by Josu Okiñena, as well as an extensive series on the Basque language starting in 2019.

We are also adding more books to the University of Nevada, Reno’s repository, making them accessible for free to the public. At the moment, about a third of our books are a part of the repository, but by the end of 2019, we will have half of our books available for free online.

We hope all these changes will help us reach a greater audience and fulfill our mission to spread Basque culture and history. Here’s to a great 2019!

Anne-Marie Chiramberro Wins Third in Basque Literary Contest

Anne-Marie Chiramberro, a Basque American from the San Francisco Bay Area and author of the blog Hella Basque, has won third in the 2018 Basque Literary Contest for her manuscript “Wannabe Basque”, which is a collection of essays that explores Chiramberro’s experience as a daughter of a Basque immigrant, and navigating being Basque in America and being American in Euskal Herria, a bit of an outlier in both places. “I’m interested in how Basque identity is passed on from Basque immigrants to their American-born children. I wanted to explore that theme in my own life. My father is from the Basque Country and my mother’s family is from the Béarn, the French region just east of the Basque Country,” Chiramberro said, “For years I’ve asked myself: How did I come to feel so strongly Basque and so disconnected from my Béarnais heritage?… This story is me reflecting on my childhood, searching for answers to these questions. I feel they could be useful in helping us to better promote Basque culture and develop Basque identity in the diaspora… Spreading Basque culture is a tool to ensure its survival. The more we disperse Basque culture, the better we will maintain our Basque identities and be understood as a people.”

Alan Griffin and the Alboka

Alan Griffin, an Irish musician, originally playing the flute and the tin whistle in traditional Irish fashion, did not think much of the alboka, the peculiar Basque, single-reed, woodwind instrument, when he first encountered it.  Griffin said that it seemed like “a kind of circus trick”.  Yet, three decades later, he became an influential part of the revitalization of the alboka and traditional Basque music.

Griffin started out playing at informal social gathering for Basque social dinners, and eventually met Txomin Artola while he was playing at a cider house with the music group Ganbara, which included the accordionist Joxan Goikoetxea and they began playing together in the group Folk Lore Sorta, which eventually evolved into the group Alboka along with Josean Martín Zarko.

Joxan Goikoetxea & Alan Griffin. Photo by: Ander Gillenea, uploaded by Aztarna via Wikimedia Commons

Joxan Goikoetxea & Alan Griffin. Photo by: Ander Gillenea, uploaded by Aztarna via Wikimedia Commons

There is so much more to the story of how Griffin, along with his alboka and the group of Alboka helped the revitalization of traditional Basque music, to learn more about the story and Griffin’s thoughts on his musical career, click the following link: https://bit.ly/2pAqCe0.

Getting to Know Basque Books: A Man Called Aita

After reading My Mama Marie this summer, I decided recently to read Joan Errea’s other book in our collection, A Man Called Aita.


 
The book was a quick read, a collection of clever poems all about Joan Errea’s father Arnaud Paris and Errea’s experience growing up on the ranches of rural Nevada. Arnaud was a kind and gentle man who was a sharp contrast to Errea’s experience with her stern mother Marie. The poems are clever and playful, complimented by the fun illustrations at the beginning of every poem, including sketches of the Paris’s sheepdog “Queenie” and the pigs that had gotten into Aita’s stash of cider. It is definitely a worth-while book to check out, especially those who are fans of My Mama Marie .

 

Paul Laxalt Dead at 96

Paul Laxalt, born in Carson City, Nevada, on August 2, 1922, died on August 5, 2018 at the age of 96. Laxalt served as both the Governor of Nevada (1967-1971) and a United States Senator (1975-1987), and was involved in politics throughout his life, serving also as a chairman of Ronald Reagan’s presidential campaigns and working with Reagan to clean up Lake Tahoe.

Laxalt went to college at Santa Clara University in California, then enlisted in the Army in World War II as a medic. Under the G.I. Bill, he went on to the University of Denver to earn his law degree. In 1950, Laxalt was elected Ormsby County’s (in northwestern Nevada, which contains Carson City) district attorney and served for one term. Laxalt was elected lieutenant governor in 1962.

10/6/1983 President Reagan Nancy Reagan Paul Laxalt Bob Michel Corrine Michel and Carol Laxalt watch the Performance by Oak Ridge Boys during the Barbecue for Members of Congress on the South Lawn by Reagan Presidential Library via Wikimedia Commons

10/6/1983 President Reagan Nancy Reagan Paul Laxalt, Bob Michel, Corrine Michel, and Carol Laxalt watch the Performance by Oak Ridge Boys during the Barbecue for Members of Congress on the South Lawn by Reagan Presidential Library via Wikimedia Commons

Laxalt was the brother of Robert Laxalt, who was the author of Sweet Promised Land, a groundbreaking novel for Basque culture in the United States, and the grandfather of Nevada’s Attorney General Adam Paul Laxalt, who is now running for Governor of Nevada.

 

Dr. Sandra Ott’s Living with the Enemy Featured on Historias Podcast

Dr. Sandra Ott

Dr. Sandra Ott

Dr. Sandra Ott, a professor here at The Center for Basque Studies, was a guest on the most recent episode of Historias, a podcast about Spanish history hosted by Foster Chamberlin, who holds a PhD from University of California, San Diego in modern European history. This episode of Historias is about the subject of Nazi occupation in the Basque Country during World War II, Ott talks about her book Living with the Enemy: German Occupation, Collaboration and Justice in the Western Pyrenees, 1940-1948which was published by Cambridge University in 2017 and how the German occupation in the 1940s affected the Basque people’s way of life.  The conversation between Chamberlin and Ott is full of stories about oppression, daring resistance, and everything from political conflict to how the occupation affected family relations. It is truly a fascinating episode. To check out the episode click the following link: https://bit.ly/2D5IpDH

Getting to Know Basque Books: Journeys, Fruits, Neighbors

Journeys, Fruits, Neighbors by Maite Gonzalez Esnal is a beautifully written book about the life experiences of Esnal, all under the three themes; her journeys as an adult linguist, the fruits she associates with her school days (figs and pomegranates) and the neighbors of her childhood home growing up in the Basque country during Franco’s dictatorship. 

Journeys, Fruits, Neighbors  is one of my favorites of the books we publish here at the Center for Basque Studies Press for multiple reasons. First and foremost, it is written so well, at times it feels as though you are reading poetry, you can see how red the pomegranate juice is, you can smell the coffee the Good Samaritan gives her. There are quotes that cut deeply and explain emotion and memory in a way only fantastic writing can. I was talking to the editor here, Daniel Montero, last week about how the author not only wrote this novel, but did her own translations from Basque to English, and I was amazed. To be this gifted at writing, not only in your native language but to be able to translate it into another language and have such beautiful, almost surreal imagery translate, was an unimaginable talent to me.

Maite Gonzalez Esnal; to read more about the publication of Journeys, Fruits, Neighbors, click here: https://bit.ly/2M03wXc

Maite Gonzalez Esnal; to read more about the publication of Journeys, Fruits, Neighbors, click here: https://bit.ly/2M03wXc

This novel, aside from the beauty of it, is also an incredibly interesting story, my favorite being the “neighbors” section of it. It is so heart-breaking, yet innocent, since Esnal wrote it from her experiences as a child, she hints towards tragedy in a way that makes it even more devastating than if she had blatantly said it. Despite the tragedy in the last section, there is a comforting glimmer of hope at the end of the book. The other sections are also great, the “journeys” section being a incredibly detailed travel journal and the “fruits” section being a bit more of a short story collection. It is hard to put this book in a box, which makes it even better. From anyone who liked Eat, Pray, Love to The Book Thief, this book has something for anyone.

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